Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘women

Political women biographiesYou may have caught BBC2’s Hillary Clinton: the Power of Women which was broadcast on 25 March 2015. The programme looked at whether women’s situation in society has changed since Clinton made a speech expressing womens rights are a human right. Their rights are seen through the eyes of three other powerful women; former United States Secretary of States Hillary Clinton, Madeleine Albright and Condolezza Rice as well as women in Afghanistan, Egypt, India and Liberia who have tried to make the changes.

If you’d like to find out more about Hillary Clinton we have these biographies in our Learning Resources Centre:

A Woman in Charge: the Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton by Carl Bernstein

Hillary Clinton by Michael Burgan (easy read)

If you’re interested in more on women politicians take a look at :

Momentum: the Struggle for Peace, Politics and the People by Mo Mowlam

Everybody Matters: a Memoir by Mary Robinson

Baroness Scotland of Asthal by Sue Adler (easy read)

Dilma Rousseff by Catherine Chambers (easy read)

The Lady and the Peacock: the Life of Aung San Suu Kyi by Peter Popham

Angela Merkel by Claire Throp (easy read)

 

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Pageant of women's work 1920

Pageant of women’s work 1920 from Hillcroft College archives

Looking in our archives of documents created in Hillcroft College reveals how much has changed and how much hasn’t. Fascinating primary sources for a social historian.

The Annual Reports provide details such as the students who were enrolled and lived in the college, who paid their fees (often their employers like Debenhams and Robertsons of jam fame) and what they ended up doing after studying here.

The Annual Report from 1920 also has a pamphlet inside it listing the schedule for the ‘Pageant of Women’s Work’. This consisted of a fair number of presentations and/or readings given by the students on the topic of famous and influential women through the ages. It starts with ‘Women in primitive times’ and goes through until ‘The woman professor’, ‘suffragist’ and ‘The woman M.P.’. They also talked about Florence Nightingale – we featured her this year in the LRC, 95 years later.

Take a look also at the footnote “Words for Tableau VI from Olive Schreiner‘s ‘Women & Labour'” – they were referencing too! Now if only we knew the page number…

The Woman’s Song of Freedom was published by the London Society for Women’s Suffrage in 1911, the music sheet can be found in the British Library’s music collections. Would anyone like to sing it again?

We have been updating the VLE calendar and the YELLOW FOLDER with events going on next month. It is fun to find out all the exciting things you can do – often for only a tenner or for free!

It’s International Women’s Day on the 8th March so there are lots of cultural events going on to celebrate and support women.

The Southbank Centre has a whole host of great speakers and guests, performances and comedy shows as part of the WoW Festival. It stands for Women of the World – and the whole world wants to be there! I am particularly interested in the debate on What will the next government do for women? It’s on at 7.45 on Monday 2nd March. I now need to book a couple of tickets before you all jump on it! You can follow all the action on Twitter or Facebook searching the hashtag .

The Museum of London Docklands is also putting on a family weekend event on the Saturday 7th March. Rich Mix in the East End has a poetry reading on 6th March – but don’t yawn – it sounds like it will be a really exciting and unusual take on poetry. It is run by Scottee who, according to the website plumpf, “a dyslexic who thinks poems should rhyme.” Intriguing!

If there are any events going on in the nearby area to Surbiton I will be on the lookout, but please let us know of anything that might appeal to the wonderful women of Hillcroft.

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Astrodeep by Rich Murray is licensed under CC BY 2.0

I read this article today in The Independent newspaper (available in the LRC) on women and science. According to research, women overestimate the need to be naturally brilliant to succeed in science and engineering. This conclusion follows from research carried out into why so few women do engineering, technology and science degrees and even fewer progress further into such fields. It seems women feel less confident in their instant intellectual abilities.

This is compounded by images in the media portraying geniuses like Sherlock Holmes who when faced with a problem immediately solve it and don’t need to work long and hard at it. I watched the film ‘Theory of Everything’ recently and Stephen Hawking is shown in the lab writing complex maths formulae all across the blackboard. He is just naturally brilliant at physics. But hard work is important too.

Hopefully we can find ways to encourage women and men to challenge themselves with subjects that seem out of reach. There are lots of ways to find out more about subjects before deciding to go to university. For example, University College London holds weekly free lectures in science for everyone to attend. The next one is called ‘Auroras Abound – Comparing the Northern Lights of Earth, Jupiter and Saturn’ on Friday, 23rd January. Does this kind of lecture interest you?

BiographiesHappy new year! We have received our first box of new books. Inside are two biographies on two remarkable fashion designers’ lives.

Firstly, ‘Elsa Schiaparelli: a biography’ by Meryle Secrest looks fascinating as it is not someone I have ever heard of. She was from Rome but then moved to London, New York and Paris during the first half of the 20th Century. Having inspiration and collaboration with artists as famous as Dali made her a star of her time.

Secondly, ‘Vivienne Westwood’ by Vivienne Westwood and Ian Kelly, is an instantly recognisable name to me. Having a quick delve into this hardback book uncovers a chapter which highlights her popularity in Asia. In Mandarin her name translates to ‘Dowager Empress West’. It also looks at her honoured place in American fashion resulting from her designer wedding dress being chosen in the hugely-successful ‘Sex and the City’ movie in 2008. She is also an activist and her voice and actions have a wide resonance.

Having a look at the blurbs and on wikipedia, it is clear that both women had lots of fashion moments of surprise and ingenuity and they often went against convention (as many artists do!). Reading about their lives gives us an insight into their cultural influences over the decades. We have lots more biographies on famous and influential women on our shelves. Come have a browse next time you are in the LRC.

Tuesday 25 November’s Guardian has an interesting article Woolf is for Women – and Mailer’s for Men? How Readers Favour Authors of Own Gender on research done by the website Good Reads about their readers reading habits. The survey found most women and men on their website read fiction where the author matches their gender. Any surprise to you?

However mostly their readers didn’t make a choice to read a male or female author from the start but just chose a book according to how interesting it seemed them.

Good Reads was inspired to run the survey having followed the Twitter campaign #Readwomen encouraging people to read books by female authors. This year a Twitter group @Readwomen2014 has been dedicated to getting female authors’ output read.

Today there’s a chance for libraries to register as a giver for World Book Night 2015. We’ll be selecting the books which we’d like to give out and you can view them on their website too. It’s your chance to be a volunteer and give out books. Plus if you register as a volunteer you can give out books you own that you want to give away free yourself. You will need to register by 30 January 2015.

 

 

 

Gothic literature and Angela Carter coversOur Access to Higher Education Humanities and Social Science students are studying Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber and other novels on a Gothic theme. We’ve already supplied them with the Company of Wolves film on DVD and copies of Gothic Literature and  The Fiction of Angela Carter: a Reader’s Essential Criticism by Sarah Gamble and Gothic Literature by Sue Chaplin. Both the BBC and the British Library are launching a focus of programmes and exhibition around the gothic.

Terror and Wonder: the Gothic Imagination from 3 October 2014 to 30 January 2015 at the British Library looks at Gothic literature, film and design influences from early literature by Walpole and Shelley to the films of Stanley Kubrick and the designs of Alexander McQueen. The British Library also has a page dedicated to Gothic Literature.

The BBC is starting a season called When Gothic Was Born. BBC4 begins next week with Andrew Graham-Dixon’s programme The Art of Gothic: Britain’s Midnight Hour on Monday 20 October @ 2100 followed by Dan Cruickshank on the architecture of Sir George Gilbert Scott and Giles Gilbert Scott  in Dan Cruickshank and the Family That Built Gothic Britain on Tuesday 21 October @ 2100. The season also covers film too.

 

 


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