Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘videos

Office 365 and MoodleOur LRC Manager has started using Jing to create a short video on how to set up Office 365 on your Moodle account. Drat and double drat! The video was great but because it relies on Flash it doesn’t work on iPads! As a result she went back to Phil Bradley’s recommendation for Ice Cream Apps in CILIP Update November 2015 and used the screen recorder to make a Windows friendly version. She asked our IT Technician for advice on getting the format of the file compatible with Office 365 so she could load the video onto Office 365’s Video area and so thanks to him she’s converted it to an MP4 file using Zamzar and then uploaded onto the video area. It’s a free piece of kit. Since then she has created two more videos showing:

Having watched Alistair McNought’s two sessions on the CILIP blog post Supporting Library Users with Hidden Disabilities from the Conference of the same name at the University of Portsmouth she’s now created transcripts for the videos to help anyone with disabilities. The transcripts can be used with screen readers like Read&Write or NaturalReader.

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Girl with teddy bearThere is a new website for employability called Facework. The focus of Facework is on developing soft skills. Things like self management, team working, being enterprising, problem solving, speaking and listening. Learning about yourself can assist you in learning other subjects and succeeding in life. They have many resources to help you become more aware and strengthen your soft skills. There are videos, posters, challenge sheets, suggested apps and quotations. For example, here are recommended tips for discovering and playing to your strengths. You can also read and listen to stories of young people who have changed their attitudes towards work. Most of all, it is a reminder that learning doesn’t stop between courses, you carry around your skills everywhere you go.

'Internet es aburrido' by Daniel Lobo is licensed under CC-BY-2.0.

Internet es aburrido‘ by Daniel Lobo is licensed under CC-BY-2.0.

Ebooks, ejournals, eresources…what is this ‘e’ all about? You may know ‘e’ stands for electronic. 99% of the time that means something available on the internet. But as I hope I can convince you, e also means extra. Getting your hands on the pages of a book is not the be all and end all of learning. For example, books often have recommended web links to access more information online. As they are coming from expert authors these extra resources are bound to be quite good.

You can view the Oxford University Press’ YouTube playlists to find inspiring topics and academics in many fields such as psychology, science and history. They also feature authors of their Very Short Introduction series to get you hooked on a new subject. Don’t worry about information overload they are usually only 5 minutes long and can satisfy your curiosity or send you in a new direction. Bear in mind they want you to read their book, but you don’t have to. The same goes with TED talks which are engaging summaries and snippets from academics and experts. They will often have written lots of information on their subjects but a TED talk will be a good overview and introduction. Also lots of advice for learning online. This one by Eli Pariser (2011) talks about online ‘filter bubbles’.

So keep an eye out next time you open a book for extra resources you can access online. Tell us about your favourites.

The internet is boring…*No it’s not.

Freebooting and Facebook sitting in a tree, piracy is rife and woe be we. In all seriousness though there are reasons why watching videos on Facebook or other social media website might be aiding the wrong people. “What is freebooting?” I hear you ask. This article on Social Media Examiner says it is a form of video piracy, usually taking someone’s else’s Youtube video and uploading it to Facebook without asking permission or saying whose work it is.

You know about academic copyright from being in college, but how about the copyright implications of sharing cat videos?The internet expands the ability to create and share information with millions of people. Copyright law impacts not just in the academic setting but in the everyday setting too – people need to give permission to share their work and have their work attributed to them. Smartereveryday uses a metaphor with sheep and rich men to explain how Facebook don’t care about video piracy and how Youtube video creators’ livelihoods are affected (with some insights from some very smart kids). Watch the video below to find out more about freebooting and what you can do to help creators:

Most students in higher education are now watching videos both in the lectures and as additional learning. Often this means going to Google or Youtube but libraries also give students access to film and other media.

To prepare for university-level learning, Hillcroft long course students have subscription access to eresources like BFI InView. This is a website with videos about British history. It includes Panorama TV documentary footage and archived party political broadcasts.

Why search the library’s eresources when Google seems so easy? Let’s have a look at features of streaming BFI Inview videos:

Advantages of BFI inview over YouTube:

  • Curated lists of videos under themes designed for students like documentaries with a range of perspectives (see different sides to history).
  • Short introductory essays to topics written by academics who have authority in their fields (impress your tutor with your references).
  • Rare footage not available on other video-sharing websites (information that you haven’t heard before).
  • Tells you how long each video is (manage your time effectively).
  • Less distraction from off-topic videos/no advertisements (manage your time effectively).

How to log in to OpenAthens:

Go though the Hillcroft VLE. Log in. Under the ‘Library and Learning Resources’ course page (enroll if this is your first time) go to  ‘LRC eresources’ and there are links to all the resources we are subscribed to under ‘Eresources Using OpenAthens’.

or

You could go directly to http://www.bfi.org.uk/inview/ and follow the button ‘log in via your institution’.

BETT 2015 is a giant exhibition for teachers and all those in education. What a treat! Yesterday I went to see the latest innovations in technology for use in all types of educational environments. It was somewhat overwhelming with hundreds of companies and seminars going on in more than one location. (The staff were so helpful in pointing me in the right direction when I got lost). I wanted to share the highlight discovery for me:

On the theme of informal online learning, I met Roar Knüppel the co-founder of Bibblio. They handpick the best free content on the internet including lots of videos, slides and other media that are really engaging and educational. For example, it has TED talks and BBC earth video collections. The are also 6 topics to browse: science, technology, people, nature, culture and society. You can follow other people’s collections of resources and/or curate your own. It’s great not to have to waste time searching through closed access, low quality or dull content – although I haven’t explored enough yet but the first impressions are golden. I have three videos to watch already in my collections.


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