Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘tips and tricks

Brainstorm on paperIt’s already midway through January 2016! Have you got more resolutions than ever to fulfill but no idea where to start? We’ve got some handy books to help you be more productive and achieve in academic and personal goals.

How about learning better ways to brainstorm or create lists? Check out: ‘How to get your own way‘ by Craig Shrives and Paul Easter. They also look at developing an argument and common fallacies. These ideas would be useful in essay-writing, presentations and everyday life. It is great when you can apply knowledge to different tasks and situations. There is also a good chapter looking at statistics and how numbers can be used to alter our perceptions.

If you want everyday psychological tools you could borrow ‘The Tools‘ by Phil Stutz and Barry Michels. They give you methods to combat negativity, worry and lack of confidence. Tips and tricks learnt through self-improvement books (aka ‘shelf-help’) can impact on many aspects of life, not least education.

Hello! We’re welcoming a new bunch of Hillcroftians this week as Access courses begin. Here’s a thought for when you’re new to a subject or want to build your knowledge base which I am sure everyone will be eager to do at this time of year 😉
Puzzled?

Testing your knowledge is fun if…you think you’re quite knowledgeable on a subject. It is not so fun when you feel intimated by a subject. A while ago I read an article about a national survey along the lines of ‘how musical is your brain’. They concluded that British people had a very high musical aptitude based on their high scores on many questions and activities. What I think was more likely was that people who volunteered to fill in the survey felt themselves to be musical. While those people who weren’t confident with music ignored the survey to avoid highlighting their lack of musical ability. Often methodologies can skew the data.

In an everyday scenario, when you really don’t want to check your bank balance (for fear that it is so low) is precisely the time when you should check your bank balance. i.e. don’t bury your head in the sand. If we apply my father’s advice to our knowledge in academic subjects or workplace, we should be checking our knowledge banks in order to gauge where we are and where we need to go, especially when we are starting out or falling behind.

I found this really good resource called Being Digital by the Open University. It’s for self-assessing study skills, particularly when using online tools. They are only 5-10 mins long and most importantly they have lots of tips and activities to get you on the right track. Go on and try the Assess your skills pathway especially if you are not confident with studying online. Let us know what you think.


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