Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘TED talks

 

dreaming
Dreaming by Hartwig HKD is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0.

In a message for International Women’s Day (last Wednesday), Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka UN Women Executive Director called for changes to be made by men and women worldwide to fight injustice. One of the most moving statements is:

 

We have to start change at home and in the earliest days of school, so that there are no places in a child’s environment where they learn that girls must be less, have less, and dream smaller than boys.

What do you think? Certainly education plays a large role in exploring those dreams: to widen participation and nurture ambition. We would add that books are resources at the heart of learning beyond the classroom.

We highlight 8 women writers and activists this month on display in the LRC. These women are: Nawal al Sadaawi, Laura BatesChimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Maya Angelou, Amy Tan, Ursula Le Guin and Margaret Atwood. We hope to inspire students to read widely, to share their thoughts and experiences and to give support to other women and men so that everyone sees their potential.

Can books and reading really help in achieving all that? Lisa Bu is one woman who talks passionately about how reading and comparing books changed her life. Her outlook on the importance of dreams (even if they are shattered) is inspiring. Listen to her story in this 5 minute TED video:

 

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'Internet es aburrido' by Daniel Lobo is licensed under CC-BY-2.0.

Internet es aburrido‘ by Daniel Lobo is licensed under CC-BY-2.0.

Ebooks, ejournals, eresources…what is this ‘e’ all about? You may know ‘e’ stands for electronic. 99% of the time that means something available on the internet. But as I hope I can convince you, e also means extra. Getting your hands on the pages of a book is not the be all and end all of learning. For example, books often have recommended web links to access more information online. As they are coming from expert authors these extra resources are bound to be quite good.

You can view the Oxford University Press’ YouTube playlists to find inspiring topics and academics in many fields such as psychology, science and history. They also feature authors of their Very Short Introduction series to get you hooked on a new subject. Don’t worry about information overload they are usually only 5 minutes long and can satisfy your curiosity or send you in a new direction. Bear in mind they want you to read their book, but you don’t have to. The same goes with TED talks which are engaging summaries and snippets from academics and experts. They will often have written lots of information on their subjects but a TED talk will be a good overview and introduction. Also lots of advice for learning online. This one by Eli Pariser (2011) talks about online ‘filter bubbles’.

So keep an eye out next time you open a book for extra resources you can access online. Tell us about your favourites.

The internet is boring…*No it’s not.


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