Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘suffragettes

Pageant of women's work 1920

Pageant of women’s work 1920 from Hillcroft College archives

Looking in our archives of documents created in Hillcroft College reveals how much has changed and how much hasn’t. Fascinating primary sources for a social historian.

The Annual Reports provide details such as the students who were enrolled and lived in the college, who paid their fees (often their employers like Debenhams and Robertsons of jam fame) and what they ended up doing after studying here.

The Annual Report from 1920 also has a pamphlet inside it listing the schedule for the ‘Pageant of Women’s Work’. This consisted of a fair number of presentations and/or readings given by the students on the topic of famous and influential women through the ages. It starts with ‘Women in primitive times’ and goes through until ‘The woman professor’, ‘suffragist’ and ‘The woman M.P.’. They also talked about Florence Nightingale – we featured her this year in the LRC, 95 years later.

Take a look also at the footnote “Words for Tableau VI from Olive Schreiner‘s ‘Women & Labour'” – they were referencing too! Now if only we knew the page number…

The Woman’s Song of Freedom was published by the London Society for Women’s Suffrage in 1911, the music sheet can be found in the British Library’s music collections. Would anyone like to sing it again?

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Votes for Women materialToday 25 February a new series starts on BBC2 called Suffragettes, For Ever! The Story of Women and Power. It’s a 3-part series looking at the beginnings of the suffragette movement fighting for women’s rights to vote going right up to the battles of the twentieth century for equality.

To chart the history Amanda Vickery looks at women’s legal rights from the eighteenth century before the suffragettes began. You can catch clips of episode 1 on the BBC Two Suffragettes For Ever! The Story of Women and Power Episode 1 page.

Our Access to Humanities and Social Science students have just finished studying the suffragette movement. Here’s an embedded search to our library catalogue to find out what we have on the suffragettes. It includes ebooks, TV recordings, DVDs and websites Or you can take a look at what we hold on women and equality.

Grayson Perry trail and National Portrait Gallery brochureAs a college Hillcroft aims to reflect the diverse background of its learners and staff. Our Access to Higher Education: Humanities and Social Science students look at identity as part of their Psychology and Sociology units. If you’re interested in diversity and equality then you’ll like the Turner Prize winning artist Grayson Perry’s exhibition Who Are You? running until 15 March 2014 at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

The exhibition follows the 14 items in the exhibition which appeared in the Channel 4 programme Grayson Perry: Who Are You? broadcast this autumn. They include a poster representing the identity and beliefs of a deaf community group, a Benin-styled statue of Peter Pan depicting a female to male transsexual and a young British woman from Kent who has converted to Islam encapsulated in a silk Hijab. Plus 3 statues of women from a women’s group which supports so called obese women. One of Perry’s signature ceramic pots portrays a gay couple who have adopted a mixed race child. You can follow Grayson’s trail of works at the National Portrait Gallery.

If you’d like to find out more about the artwork go through backruns of the TV programme by visiting 4oD.

At the same time the National Portrait Gallery is displaying Suffragettes: Deeds Not Words examining how the suffragette movement spent the summer of 1914 increasing their fight for the vote and protesting against the Cat and Mouse Act up. The display runs up to 10 May 2015.

Both the exhibition and the display offer free entry.

Revolutionary Lives book coversThis autumn we’ve added two new autobiographies of famous female suffragettes to our collection which are part of Pluto Press’s series on Revolutionary Lives. They focus on Sylvia Pankhurst, daughter of Emmeline Pankhurst, and Ellen Wilkinson Both of these are relevant to our Access to Higher Education (HE) Humanities and Social Science students who study female emancipation as part of their history course. We’ve also bought a copy of Molly Housego’s book:

The Women’s Suffrage Movement

which is a colourful easy read to the fight for women’s voting rights.

We’ve also been adding a range of books on sporting women to our biographies collection. These include:

My Life: Queen of the Court by Daniel Paisner and Serena Williams

Serena and Venus Williams: Tennis Stars by Gregory N. Peters

Maria Sharapova by Jeff Savage

Game, Set and Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women’s Sports by Susan Ware

Sporting women book covers

 

PoppyThe LRC team has keenly been recording the latest programmes from the World War I season on BBC 2 over the past few weeks. These include:

The World’s War: Forgotten Soldiers of Empire

which explored the recruitment and deployment of soldiers from Africa, India and Asia by the British, French and Germans on the Western Front and throughout the empire.

Our Access to Higher Education Humanities and Social Science students examine the role of women in the First World in the context of the fight for women’s right to vote. BBC 2’s broadcast of Kate Adie’s Women of World War One focused on how the suffragettes gave up their struggle for votes to work for the war effort.

Our students also look at the Raj and slave trade as part of their history programme. The opening of the Black Cultural Archives in Brixton will be a great supplement to their studies. The current exhibition is Re-imagine: Black Women in Britain running until 30 November with free entry. Plus you can explore their catalogue of resources online.

Hillcroft CollgeThis week BBC 2 started a two-part series on Shopgirls: The True Story of Life Behind the Counter presented by Dr Pamela Cox. Shown on Tuesday 24 June at 2100 the programme charts how women first become involved in shop work and the conditions they worked under.

When it was originally set up in 1920 Hillcroft College  included shop assistants from Debenhams department store amongst its first cohort who were sponsored by Debenhams to improve their education and skills. Our LRC team is recording the programme to add to our archive on women.

Hillcroft is based in the house which belonged to Wilberforce Bryant the owner of the famous Bryant & May matchstick factory in east London where the matchgirls went on strike. 5 July next week marks 126 years since the strike and there is a series of events taking place at the second Matchwomen’s Festival at Hamilton House in London. It includes talks on the strikers, walks and also examines working conditions today. Tickets are £2 and the under 16s go free. Louise Raw author of Strike a Light will be speaking and Kate Connelly on her book about the suffragette leader Sylvia Pankhurst Sylvia Pankhurst: Suffragette, Socialist and Scourge of Empire. Our team will be adding both of these books to our collection.

 

 

 

 


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