Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘relationships

Books from Reading Agency's Reading Well list on stress and self-esteemWe’ve been adding some more of the Reading Agency’s Reading Well book list for young people to our collection.

The latest batch gives you advice on how to boost your self-confidence:

Self-Esteem and Being You by Anita Naik

and how to overcome stress in your life:

Fighting Invisible Tigers: Stress Management for Teens by Earl Hipp

The Teenage Guide to Stress by Nicola Morgan

The Anxiety Survival Gide for Teens: CBT Skills to Overcome Fear, Worry & Panic by Jennifer Shannon

The stress guides help you handle problems with friends, family, eating, exams, bullying, cyber bullying and social media. As well as issues with drugs, alcohol and self-harming. If you are not a student at Hillcroft College. You can find copies from this collection in your local public library.

Last week we posted about novellas. We asked which of the prize-winning short books written by women would you like to read whilst at Hillcroft:

Being a college for women means that we try to make women feature prominently in our book collections where suitable. Not just female authors, but female characters too. Yet would we want to read books by women about women? According to the article ‘Books about women less likely to win prizes, study finds‘ – apparently not. Women seem to prefer books about male lead characters and supports the argument for “women’s perspectives being considered uninteresting or unworthy” (Flood 2015).

Uninteresting? Unworthy?….Really?

Do the above novellas feature women as main characters? After reading the short summaries below, do those with main female characters sound as interesting as the other stories?

Three Blind Mice is a murder mystery with a bunch of characters stuck in a house together knowing one of the group is a killer.

The Photograph centers around a female character, Kath… who is dead.

The Grandmothers is about two women who fall in love with each other’s sons.

The Awakening is about a woman who has an unhappy marriage (controversial when it was written in 1899!)

The Artist of Disappearance is about a man called Ravi who lives in solitude on a mountain in India.

The Pre-War House & other stories features families often in dark situations.

Black Water centres on a woman who is attracted to a very powerful, older man at a party.

Heartstones is a Gothic thriller about two sisters living with their widowed father. One of the sisters is obsessed with taking her mother’s place.

Brokeback Mountain is about love between two cowboys.

Mathilda is told by a woman on her deathbed about her sad life without a mother and a disastrous relationship with her father. Published 150 years after it was written because it was so controversial.

Prime of Miss Jean Brodie is centred around the sinister influence that a charismatic female teacher has on girls in school.

Black Sheep is an especially bleak tale about a family in a small mining village.

So there we have it, lots of family drama and controversial relationships. There are strong and strange female characters aplenty. Yet all the stories are based in Western cultures apart from The Artist of Disappearance – but addressing that issue would be another whole blog post.

Feminist writers French and EnglishAs the national residential college for women we collect material on women’s history, women’s rights and feminism. So as you can imagine we were delighted to get a postcard from the British Library alerting us to a new oral history resource called Sisterhood and after: an oral history of the Women’s Liberation Movement.

Sisterhood charts the history of the Women’s Liberation Movement in the United Kingdom from the 1960s to 1980s through oral testimonies. It’s broken down into themes; family and children, mind, body and spirit, sex, love and friendship, race, place and nation, education,equality and work, activism, politics and legislation, change, culture and art and who we were, how we are.  It also includes biographies of the participants and a timeline.

With British Library permission granted you’ll find it through our Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC).


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