Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘referencing

CoLRic Quality Impact Nov 2016This week our two articles for the Council for Learning Resources in Colleges (CoLRiC) Quality Impact magazine are out in the November issue. You need to be a CoLRiC member to access the journal. We’ve scanned them for you to take a look.

They look back at our CoLRiC Best Practice Awards 2015 entries which gained second prize in the Information Literacy category and third prize in the Customer Service one.

We’ve updated the news on both so the referencing one discusses our championing of RefMe with our Access to Humanities and Social Sciences, Pre Access and Diploma in Massage Therapy learners. The app is freely available and makes compiling a reference list or bibliography a breeze. Our VLE redesign for dyslexia article looks at the integration we’ve made with Single Sign On over the eresources, library catalogue and Office 365 and the Management Information System (MIS).

 

 

Information sources mindmap - available on the VLE

Information sources mindmap – available on the VLE.

To get the better grades in assignments they are looking for you to draw from a wide range of relevant information sources to reinforce your ideas. There is no end to good sources of information available to you, but navigating your way through to the best ones takes practice and guidance. Here’s a little guidance, but please ask for help from the LRC team if you are stuck.

To start out with it is advisable to find information from generalist sources such as encyclopaedias and subject specific dictionaries. For instance to find definitions of key words included in your essay question. They have more authority than Wikipedia when it comes to referencing. However, starting an assignment is scary and overwhelming, perhaps try listening to a podcast on the topic or watching a video to get more familiar with it in a short time without needing to open a book.

After getting a better picture of the topic and identifying the key words next you could move on to more specialist sources such as subject books, ebooks, newspaper and journal articles. We have access to these through the MyAthens log in page on the VLE and our borrowing service. Let us know if you have forgotten your password, it happens to almost everyone. Alternatively, search on newspaper websites and  such as The Guardian or through Google Scholar.

There’s a mindmap of information sources that is posted on the VLE under LRC FAQs –> Resources.

Pageant of women's work 1920

Pageant of women’s work 1920 from Hillcroft College archives

Looking in our archives of documents created in Hillcroft College reveals how much has changed and how much hasn’t. Fascinating primary sources for a social historian.

The Annual Reports provide details such as the students who were enrolled and lived in the college, who paid their fees (often their employers like Debenhams and Robertsons of jam fame) and what they ended up doing after studying here.

The Annual Report from 1920 also has a pamphlet inside it listing the schedule for the ‘Pageant of Women’s Work’. This consisted of a fair number of presentations and/or readings given by the students on the topic of famous and influential women through the ages. It starts with ‘Women in primitive times’ and goes through until ‘The woman professor’, ‘suffragist’ and ‘The woman M.P.’. They also talked about Florence Nightingale – we featured her this year in the LRC, 95 years later.

Take a look also at the footnote “Words for Tableau VI from Olive Schreiner‘s ‘Women & Labour'” – they were referencing too! Now if only we knew the page number…

The Woman’s Song of Freedom was published by the London Society for Women’s Suffrage in 1911, the music sheet can be found in the British Library’s music collections. Would anyone like to sing it again?

Cite Them RightLast week our LRC Manager was helping our Preaccess students complete their referencing for their Information Communications Technology (ICT)/Biology assignment. Many of the students had got links from websites but weren’t sure how to reference them and they were struggling with the websites trying to work out what the title was and the publication date.

Pears and Shields Cite Them Right gives you all the advice you need on how to create a reference for a website. It’s especially handy when you cannot find the author or date on the website and advises you what to do in the body of your essay and on a reference list. In the latest edition you’ll find referencing has gotten shorter – you don’t need to put [Online] in like you used to in the past. Referencing and Plagiarism by Kate Williams and Jude Carroll has a great graphic showing you the elements you’ll need online to form your reference.

If you’re getting mixed up about what order all the elements go in then just keep in mind  ‘It’s an author + date system’, as our LRC Assistant says. That immediately should trigger that you need the author to come first and then the date.

 

My linoit board of tasks

My linoit board of tasks today

Hello all, I am Philippa and I joined the LRC team two weeks ago. I have just finished my Masters in Information and Library Studies so it’s wonderful to be able to see how everything I’ve learnt has real life applications. I have been busy learning the ropes and meeting everyone.

Here are some key online resources I have been becoming familiar with:

Dawsonera ebooks

Available through the MyAthens sign on page. This is great for accessing books 24/7 and you can’t lose them or spill coffee on them! We are keen to add more ebooks and get them used more by everyone. They can be a bit difficult to handle to start with, but it is possible to read online or you can download and/or print out useful segments (being respectful of copyright restrictions).

TIP: I found out for downloaded ebooks in Adobe Reader you can customise the colour settings of the paper background and text. This is under the options toolbar: Edit –> Preferences –> Accessibility then checking the box ‘Replace document colors’.

Referencing handbook

We held referencing induction sessions with the access courses. Getting all the right bits of bibliographic information in the right order can be frustrating but correct referencing is essential for academic integrity.

TIP: I write out the full reference when taking notes from a resource. The details don’t have to be in the right order straight away – although it helps. As long as you jot down the key fields like author, date and title then you can often revisit the resource by looking it up on the catalogue or on the internet later. The handbook produced by the University of Lincoln can help you when it comes to writing out the references in full. The handbook can be found on the VLE (under the blocks Library and Learning Resources –>  LRC Referencing and Plagiarism –> Text Assistance).

Linoit (memo board)

I was introduced to this virtual pinboard for memos and tasks (or anything you want!). I found it simple to post ‘stickies’ and to peel them off once they are done (in the right hand corner of the sticky).

TIP: I like changing the colour of the sticky memo and giving it a cute icon to make task management more appealing. You can read more about task management in Stella Cottrell’s book ‘Skills for Success’.

If you have any tips or good experiences using these resources please comment below or come and talk to me during the week. I would be delighted to hear from you either way!

Britannica displayThis week our Access to Higher Education students are finishing off their course work on Human Biology. They’ve been looking at how viruses spread as wells as fungi and other parasites and how they develop.

As usual there is a wealth of material on our library catalogue to help them. This academic year we’ve been showing them how to use Britannica Academic Online which not only has regular encylopedia definitions of terms but also comes with embedded videos and scholarly academic articles too.

The Learning Resources team have been themselves somewhat under the microscope this week as Ofsted have been assessing our impact on learners and also our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). This has given us the chance to show how we respond to our learners’ requests for material in different formats (DVDs, audio CDs) as well as suggestions for science fiction  and confidence material, biographies, books on other countries as well as short stories. We have been reinforcing the skills we teach in inductions (using ebooks, referencing, copyright and plagiarism) through the use of Vokis, GoAnimate, Xerte learning objects and quizzes on the VLE. And in doing so boosting their functional skills in using Information Technology.

Catalogue pcIt’s half term this week so the Learning Resources team have been beavering away creating Learning Objects with Xerte Online Toolkits to reinforce the inductions we’ve been doing with Access to Higher Education and Preaccess students on referencing and copyright.

The great thing about using Xerte to do this is it has built-in disability features so students using them can change the font size and the colour to suit their needs. Plus we can plug in audio, images and much more. We’ve started off with some fill the gaps and categories for referencing and for copyright we’ve tried the multiple choice quizzes. We’ve found it great fun adding in feedback for the multiple choice.  Find out more about what you can do with Xerte and examples of Learning Objects on the University of Nottingham’s Resources page.

Once the learning objects are ready we’re embedding them onto our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) pages so our students can do them on and offsite. If you are one of students or tutors you can see what we’ve done on the LRC Referencing and Plagiarism page.