Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘Pre-Access

Jisc Hillcroft College Small is (digitally) beautifulOver the summer Jisc published our case study on digital skills development at Hillcroft College in their Case Studies: Journeys Towards Digital Capability. The report also explains how we’ve been developing digital skills with students and teaching staff.

As a student you will have either experienced the Learning Resources Centre (LRC) team bringing in iPads or Kindles into the classroom or taken part in our information skills workshops where we teach you how to search for material on the catalogue, use ebooks, reference using the Citation Machine and about copyright and plagiarism. Read our case study Hillcroft College. Small is (Digitally) Beautiful.

This autumn we have been using Class OneNote Notebooks in the class room with Access to Higher Education (HE) Humanities and Social Sciences, Access to HE Health and Human Sciences and Introduction to Pre Access learners. Following the training we have been doing on Microsoft Imagine Academy.

As Digital & Learning Resources Manager introducing students to the Class OneNote Notebook I’ve found it really takes over from using an interactive whiteboard. Students and I have been impressed by the dyslexia-friendly Immersive Reader with its read aloud feature which also gives you the chance to change the font size and style and colour. We’ve all really liked the collaboration space which we’ve used in Introduction to Pre Access to share work we’ve done in pairs and groups creating Harvard references.

What’s also really useful is the ability to send material from the content library out into students’ individual note books and all of the tagging features so I can set up things for students to do that they can then tick off once complete. Here’s an example of the checklist

Pre Access with checklist

 

 

 

 

 

 

and another of showing the different tags you can add to make it easier to guide the student through material
Pre Access Classroom OneNote Notebook with tags

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CoLRic Quality Impact Nov 2016This week our two articles for the Council for Learning Resources in Colleges (CoLRiC) Quality Impact magazine are out in the November issue. You need to be a CoLRiC member to access the journal. We’ve scanned them for you to take a look.

They look back at our CoLRiC Best Practice Awards 2015 entries which gained second prize in the Information Literacy category and third prize in the Customer Service one.

We’ve updated the news on both so the referencing one discusses our championing of RefMe with our Access to Humanities and Social Sciences, Pre Access and Diploma in Massage Therapy learners. The app is freely available and makes compiling a reference list or bibliography a breeze. Our VLE redesign for dyslexia article looks at the integration we’ve made with Single Sign On over the eresources, library catalogue and Office 365 and the Management Information System (MIS).

 

 

Book by Dave Higgins is licensed under CC-BY-2.0.

Book by Dave Higgins is licensed under CC-BY-2.0.

Pre-access to Higher Education students have been looking at sources this week. Do you know the difference between a peer-remewed…sorry peer-reviewed journal and and a professional journal?

A peer-reviewed journal has a board of expert editors looking over the submitted articles before they are published. Here’s a great blog post explaining more about what to look out for to see whether it is a peer-reviewed article. They are found mainly at university level with professors and researchers who already know a lot about their subjects as the target audience. Here’s a website called OpenDOAR where you can search for university-level articles, many of which are peer-reviewed. However, rather than reading the whole thing you may just want to get an overview of the the research and conclusions by reading the abstract.

On the other hand we have journals that are aimed at people working in the professions that they are writing for. We have a number in the LRC, such as ‘New Scientist’ and ‘New Statesman’. These have shorter articles and the language is often easier to understand than peer-reviewed journals. The editing process is not as strict so the information may not have as much authority as that of peer-reviewed articles. However, they are still excellent sources.

Did we miss anything out? We hope you are enjoying the first stages of your project.

El Planeta Apple by Jorge Elias is licensed under CC-BY-2.0.

El Planeta Apple by Jorge Elias is licensed under CC-BY-2.0.

This week Pre-Access To Higher Education students have been putting forward working titles for their projects. Many are tackling current health and social issues.

The research process has lots of steps. Some steps might not even seem like steps at all because they all overlap and you may go back and forth between them. One ‘step’ in starting a project is scouting out possible information sources for up-to-date numbers and research to spark ideas.

Getting a feel for what information is out there will also help you narrow your topic down to something manageable.

It is also perfectly normal to feel anxious about the amount of information out there. Don’t worry yet about analysing your information sources – they exist, and you can access them if you need them, that is what is important to start with.

Here are some free, authoritative and timely sources of information and data on the web:

Check out the VLE eresources page too for paid subscriptions to information sources.

Of course we have lots of books such as subject encyclopaedias to start you off too. Come in to the LRC and browse.

Someone using a smartphoneOne of our ebooks suppliers Dawsonera has launched a new app for the iPhone and Android. This is good news for our Access to Higher Education, Pre-Access, Women into Management (WiM), Start Your Own Enterprise and Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (PTLLS) students.

This means that ebooks are even more mobile and our students can read them easily off site and when they are travelling. We know from sifting through our student feedback forms that students have been using ebooks on their laptops on the train so this app launch will make it even easier for them.

Follow the Dawsonera guide to Downloading  ebooks to an Android Device or Downloading ebooks onto an Apple iOS Device.

Find out how great ebooks are by watching our new Don’t Scruff the Books Use Ebooks animation on GoAnimate.


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