Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘pictures

Non-fiction with picturesGetting new textbooks and non-fiction books that are suitable for Further Education students is an enjoyable and challenging part of the LRC team’s job. There are fantastic books on all subjects but the problem is that some are higher education focused, i.e. really wordy.

Making the most of Illustrations is a central part of reading. A picture tells a thousand words, right? We keep an eye out for non-fiction that has lots of pictures and graphics alongside high-quality writing.This is good news for a faster engagement with new topics and understanding for visual learners such as dyslexics. At the same time, non-fiction books that are less text-heavy are also easier to skim read and skip to key subheadings. These can be good reading strategies. Humour is often used too which can make even the driest subject more interesting.

Here are a few titles that are new and focus on illustrating the issues (we’re not saying these subjects are dry!):

Let us know what other non-fiction ‘picture books’ you like. Which subjects lend themselves well to being illustrated or is this approach just for children?

Woman with camera

Woman with camera (Domenico 2014)

Finding images for projects and assignments that are not under strict copyright restrictions needn’t be a headache.

The ‘Unsplash‘ website has many Creative Commons Zero high-resolution photographs for anyone to download and reuse (even for commercial purposes). This means that as long as you cite the photograph then you can place it in your work. The creators have waived their rights to their photographs.

Unsplash’s online collection includes photographs of buildings, food, computers, forests and other natural places. It is not possible to search for images, but they are aimed at being able to illustrate lots of different topics or just add a touch of attractiveness. They add  10 new photographs every 10 days. It is nice not to be overwhelmed with images as with other image databases.

I came across the Unsplash site through Phil Bradley’s library blog which highlights loads of websites, great internet tools and apps that you might also be interested in.

Pears and Shields (2013) give an outline for how to cite photographs from the internet:

  • Photographer
  • Year of publication (in round brackets).
  • Title of photograph (in italics).
  • Available at: URL.
  • (Accessed/downloaded: date).

For example: Domenico, M. (2014) Untitled. Available at: https://unsplash.com/miadomenico (Accessed: 21 November 2014).


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