Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘notes

Taking notesA few weeks ago at an Institute of Customer Service Assessor’s Forum I was getting a refresher on note taking which is an essential part of the Professional Qualifications assessment process. If you are new to taking notes then The Palgrave Study Skills Making Notes page outlines the different styles you can try.

It’s worth learning about the Cornell method where you split the paper into areas so you have an area for making notes on, another for summarising the key points/words/questions and another for condensing the main ideas. Wiki How to Take Cornell Notes will help you try this out. It was created at Cornell University.

Another note taking method is the Charting one where you have headed columns so you can log subjects that similar into the same column. This handy document from California Polytechnic State University explains how it works.

The Palgrave Study Skills Making Notes complements the Charting one outlining how to use pattern notes to create two columns, two different colours of notes or notes on two different set of pages to then make connections between the notes. One set of notes is a summary of what you hear and the other is a related analysis of what you think of it. This is a useful for making sure you don’t use someone else’s words or ideas. In other words it helps you avoid plagiarism when you use the notes for an essay.

Pattern notes is another style Palgrave recommend where you have a key idea in the centre then branch out to create notes that relate to the main theme and look at it more in-depth. They suggest you can use particular shapes to make the other ideas stand out and then find an overall image to help you recall what the notes and ideas are. This will be very useful for exams and where you need to turn your notes into an essay. This style of note taking is also known as mind maps, spidergrams or concept maps.

It’s worth getting a copy of Jeanne Godfrey’s Reading and Making Notes which is part of the Pocket Study Skills guide which explains how to make notes in an easy-digestible format.

If you want to get digital savvy then Popplet is a handy app you can use for creating notes in a graphic way. Download it here for Android or iOS devices.

 

Britannica AcademicThis week we’ve been adjusting the links to Britannica Academic on our LRC Eresources Moodle Book as it’s had a makeover.

The new look Britannica Academic lets you:

 

  • cross search over ImageQuest
  • read the latest articles added from the homepage
  • find the most recent changes to articles via the new history tab
  • get country information via an interactive map
  • compare country data
  • access primary source material from history, literature, the law, politics and science through the Original Sources option (this includes books, images and documents).

The new version comes with a new accessibility feature – + / – buttons for you to increase and decrease the font. And you can even switch the language on the page. Register with them and you can create your own research area to save searches and add notes. Watch the video to find out more:

 

Of Mice and MenOur GCSE English students on Preaccess A and B are studying John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men. We’ve done some research on supporting material for students and found a recording of Steinbeck on YouTube discussing Of Mice and Men and Grapes of Wrath.

For anyone doing an assignment for GCSE BBC Bitesize – Of Mice and Men has some handy links with character information, plot summary, themes and videos.

In the LRC we also have copies of:

Wnat to know more about Steinbeck’s characters from  his novels? Take a look at the Library of Congress’s John Steinbeck Map of America on the American Treasures of the Library of Congress. The map by Molly Maguire has pictures of characters and numbers on the map to indicate which novel they appear in.

If you’re into apps there’s a free download from the National Theatre with interviews with the cast James Franco and Chris O’Dowd and a Revise Of Mice and Men app on Appcrawlr.

Last but not least there’s an interview with a volunteer archivist at the National Steinbeck Center on the Authors Road: John Steinbeck, Novelist and More

Shelf of books with ebookThis week the Learning Resources team have been continuing the induction programme for our Access to Higher Education and Preaccess students. We’ve been demonstrating the joys of using ebooks and how to do Harvard referencing.

As a student it’s often easy to make notes on what you’re reading then be unable to unscramble your handwriting later when it comes to writing your essay, putting in your references and creating a bibliography. Ebooks on Dawsonera make it an easy job by allowing you to create notes and save them on individual ebooks as you read them. And they don’t disappear unless you delete them.

Find out why ebooks are just the ticket on our GoAnimate video Don’t Scuff the Books Use Ebooks animation. You’ll find out you can make your librarian’s day!

Woman Studying

Before the Christmas break we ordered in copies of the Palgrave Pocket Study Skills books which are a set of dinky books helping students with:

  • reading and making notes
  • planning essays
  • writing
  • referencing and avoiding plagiarism
  • passing exams
  • doing search
  • studying with dyslexia
  • writing reports
  • thinking critically
  • managing time
  • working well in groups.

You can find them all listed on our Online Public Access Catalogue onsite and offsite.

What’s fantastic about these is you can buy audio formats of these books too. Visit the Palgrave Macmillan website for more information. We’d love to be able to offer this format to our students…

There’s also a host of useful information to help you study better oon the Palgrave Study Skills website.

Over the Easter break we’ve placed all the ebooks you can use on ebrary into our Heritage library catalogue.

This means that you can use the catalogue as your first port of call to look for ebooks produced by ebrary and Dawsonera.

When you search for an ebook on the library catalogue you then get not only the cover of the ebook but also a link to the actual ebook itself. You will need to use your OpenAthens username and password to use the ebook to make notes, highlight text and print or save material.

Here’s a taster for you:

Neil McNaughton’s Understanding British and  European Political Issues


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 288 other followers

Follow me on Twitter