Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘Mental Health

Reading Well pile of books

We are in the process of adding titles from the Reading Agency’s Reading Well book selection into our library.

Health professionals and young people have recommended the books on the Reading Well. The books help you combat anxiety, depression, lack of confidence, stress, bullying and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

 

Here are the latest arrivals from the list which are on our shelves for you to borrow:

Kite Spirit by Sita Bramacharmi

The Self-Esteem Team’s Guide to Sex, Drugs and WTFs!! by Grace Barrett

House of Windows by Alexia Casale

Quiet the Mind: an Illustrated Guide on How to Meditate by Matthew Johnstone

Everyday by David Levithan

Blame My Brain  – the Amazing Teenage Brain Revealed by Nicola Morgan

I’ll Give Your the Sun by Jandy Nelson

We’ll post again when the next batch of titles have been added to our book shelves.

mind

Mind by Caterina SM is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0.

We all need tools to help us nurture a state of contentment and help others feel less anxious and stressed. You may have come across the idea of mindfulness, either in the newspapers, books or on television. Mindfulness is associated with Buddhism, yoga, meditation, those who have the money to go on retreats or indulge in fads. For those skeptics, this Scientific American article weighs up mindfulness and meditation from a creativity and calmness viewpoint. This TED talk looks at how regularly employing techniques like meditation shapes our brains.

If you are now convinced to find out more about mindfulness, we have many new books and ebooks that present the benefits of taking stock of a situation and appreciating the present rather than worrying for the future. These books are often called ‘Shelf-help’ books in libraries.

If you have a login to the Hillcroft VLE, check out the ebooks in the series ‘Can I tell you about…? ‘. They look at common learning difficulties and strategies to manage them, many through the lens of mindfulness’ psychological cousin, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT).

If you don’t fancy a book, Candis Magazine also provides are some simple tips and tricks for wellbeing.

The current issue of the New Scientist has a special feature about Sleep.

There aSleep + womanre nine pages that start with a graphic about the key to good sleep, noting the effects of aspects like light pollution, pets and temperature control. It continues with answers to questions such as – ‘How much shut-eye do I need? Can I cheat by sleeping in bits? What’s the best way to get to sleep?’

The final section is written by Russell Foster who is the director of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute and discusses the links between sleep and mental health.

If you want to know more about sleep after reading this article, try these materials available in the LRC:

Sleep and electroencephalograms (EEG) Advanced Biology (2000) by Roberts, Reiss & Monger.

Sleep deprivation The Private Life of the Brain (2000) by Greenfield.

Sleep disorders The Oxford Companion to the Body (2001) by Blakemore & Jennett (editors).

Insomnia The Stressed Sex: uncovering the truth about men, women and mental health (2013) by Freeman & Freeman.

Sleep and the Biological approach Psychology: the science of the mind and behaviour (2015) 7th edn. by Gross. Also as an ebook. Additionally, AQA A-level Psychology Book 1 (2015) by Lawton et al.

 

rottweiler-outline-800pxLast week was Depression Awareness Week. To help raise awareness we would like to share information and resources about emotional disorders and mental health.

In an article for The Guardian, Tim Lott describes depression as a curse. Tim recounts what it feels like to be depressed. Depressed people have more persuasive, bleak imagination and a deep-rooted sense of the meaninglessness of modern life.

There is a secret feeling most people enjoy that everything, at a fundamental level, is basically OK. Depressives suffer the withdrawal of that feeling, and it is frightening not only to experience but to witness.

The MIND charity has information online on depression. In addition, we have a number of books that look at depression, its symptoms, causes and treatments.

Freeman and Freeman’s ‘Know Your Mind’ (2009) draws on sound advice from across a great variety of authoritative sources on maintaining and improving psychological health.

They have also written ‘The stressed sex’ (2013) looking at why more women suffer from depression than men.

Johnston’s  ‘Living with a black dog’ (2008) uses a visual expression of depression as a black dog to give an insight into what depression and living with a depressed person feels like and what can be done to improve the situations.

There is a Dawsonera e-book available through the VLE eresouces, Brier’s ‘Brilliant Cognitive Behavioural Therapy’ that looks at boosting self-esteem and grappling with negative thinking.

It’s a changing field of study but the stigma against depressed people is persistent, it will take us all to lift the curse.

Mindfulness booksFrom our September bookshop run – where we hit the high street and look for books covering our curriculum areas and boost our progression collection – we’ve added some new books on mindfulness.

What is mindfulness? It’s a technique based on meditation from Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism and Christianity that keeps you in the present moment and gets you to push aside negative thoughts and anxieties about the past and the future. It promotes wellbeing in your mind and in your body. Being mindful is about scanning your mind and body to check out how you are feeling and how you are breathing. Once you’ve done your barometer health check then you can put into action ways of getting your mind and body on an even keel.

Here’s three of the books we’ve bought:

Mindfulness on the Go: Peace in Your Pocket by by Padraig O’Morain

The Mindfulness Survival Kit by Thich Nhat Hanh

The Rough Guide to Mindfulness by Albert Tobler and Susann Herrmann

We’ve also added an ebook :

Mindfulness Pocket Book: Little Exercises for a Calmer Life by Gill Hasson

They’ll explain what mindfulness is, its origins and equip you with the techniques to practise on a daily basis.

The Rough Guides book comes with a free set of downloads to assist you with meditations. To find out more about mindfulness take a look at the NHS Choices information on Mindfulness on Mind’s website.

 

Brainstorm on paperIt’s already midway through January 2016! Have you got more resolutions than ever to fulfill but no idea where to start? We’ve got some handy books to help you be more productive and achieve in academic and personal goals.

How about learning better ways to brainstorm or create lists? Check out: ‘How to get your own way‘ by Craig Shrives and Paul Easter. They also look at developing an argument and common fallacies. These ideas would be useful in essay-writing, presentations and everyday life. It is great when you can apply knowledge to different tasks and situations. There is also a good chapter looking at statistics and how numbers can be used to alter our perceptions.

If you want everyday psychological tools you could borrow ‘The Tools‘ by Phil Stutz and Barry Michels. They give you methods to combat negativity, worry and lack of confidence. Tips and tricks learnt through self-improvement books (aka ‘shelf-help’) can impact on many aspects of life, not least education.

Sharing ideas and meeting others with similar experiences has been what the internet has enabled since its beginning. Twitter and Facebook and other social networking sites have taken this to a new level. However the humble internet forum still thrives to bring together communities online. There are forums for everything you can think of, from mental health and business women.

Their aims are to be supportive and informative. However, posting to a forum will require the same level of responsibility and care as posting anywhere on the web. More practical tips about e-safety can be read on this website.

On the Hillcroft VLE there are also opportunities to take part in discussion forums on different courses. Your views really are heard, so don’t be shy with voicing your opinion and reflecting on it. It is great practice for developing an argument for an essay or to be more assertive in everyday life.