Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘maths

Astrodeep400207aea

Astrodeep by Rich Murray is licensed under CC BY 2.0

I read this article today in The Independent newspaper (available in the LRC) on women and science. According to research, women overestimate the need to be naturally brilliant to succeed in science and engineering. This conclusion follows from research carried out into why so few women do engineering, technology and science degrees and even fewer progress further into such fields. It seems women feel less confident in their instant intellectual abilities.

This is compounded by images in the media portraying geniuses like Sherlock Holmes who when faced with a problem immediately solve it and don’t need to work long and hard at it. I watched the film ‘Theory of Everything’ recently and Stephen Hawking is shown in the lab writing complex maths formulae all across the blackboard. He is just naturally brilliant at physics. But hard work is important too.

Hopefully we can find ways to encourage women and men to challenge themselves with subjects that seem out of reach. There are lots of ways to find out more about subjects before deciding to go to university. For example, University College London holds weekly free lectures in science for everyone to attend. The next one is called ‘Auroras Abound – Comparing the Northern Lights of Earth, Jupiter and Saturn’ on Friday, 23rd January. Does this kind of lecture interest you?

Enquiry desk overlooking the gardenThis weekend 25-26 January is the Royal Society of the Protection of  Birds (RSPB) Big Garden Birdwatch which gets all of us out counting the number of birds we see in our gardens or parks.

This is a great thing to do for our residential learners at Hillcroft College as it gets you not only to test out your numeracy skills but also to recognise different species of birds.

The Hillcroft garden is a fantastic spot for birds. Our Learning Resources Centre which overlooks the garden enables us to see robins, wood pigeons, green woodpeckers, blackbirds, magpies, wrens and blue and great tits on a regular basis.

All you need to do is pick an hour and register the maximum number of each kind of bird that you see within that hour. Don’t count ones flying overhead. Children will enjoy taking part too. You can register what you’ve spotted on the RSPB’s Big Garden Birdwatch page.

How about taking your maths skills further? Find out about numeracy courses coming up at Hillcroft on the English and Maths link on our Courses page.


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 288 other followers

Follow me on Twitter