Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘humour

Mavis Cheek in the literature section

Mavis Cheek in the literature section.

We’ve currently merged popular fiction with our literary fiction. It has always been difficult to maintain a distinction between the two for a long time. Popular fiction is usually easier to read and newer books whereas literary fiction are more demanding to read and could be considered classics. The writer KW Taylor suggests that it comes down to what the reader thinks.

We moved the books and weeded out the tatty and unborrowed ones (they have gone to a good home through Better World Books). Because literary fiction is classified using the Dewey Decimal system it makes it easier to browse on the shelf as it distinguishes between languages and countries where it has been written. For example, our biggest section of the literary shelf is now 823, which is shorthand for ‘English fiction’.  It makes it more obvious which fiction we need more of, such as our world literature (other than North American) which is a quite small collection at the moment. We aim to grow it to better suit our international focus and interests as a college overall.

We’ve also come across some gems again. We have more than 10 books by author Mavis Cheek who came to Hillcroft College in the 1970s. If you are in need of a good book to read or to be inspired by her creativity and humour then you could try reading her books.

We have been busy searching for and ordering DVDs that feature brilliant actors such as Julie Christie and Glenn Close in their later years. Media representations of older people can be mainly of stereotypes, such as the grumpy old man or the nice little old lady. These films go beyond the stereotypes and open our world to view from different perspectives. Many books and films use the story-telling device of having an older person looking back on their youth and the events that happened to them. These movies don’t do that, they focus on the present time of the characters and what happens after or approaching retirement age.

The themes that they cover include loyalty, the autumn of life and separation of loved ones through death and traumatic experiences. ‘Away from Her’, ‘Still Mine’ and ‘Poetry’ also deal with the difficult subject of Alzheimer’s disease (a form of dementia). ‘Albert Nobbs’ is about a butler who wants to get away from his job in which he has had to pretend to be a man for 30 years. It’s not all doom and gloom though as ‘The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel’ paints a humourous portrait of older people from Britain adapting to new situations in India.

You can borrow up to 3 DVDs (free of charge) during staffed hours 9.00am-5.30pm, Monday to Friday. We have many more you can browse too, there’s bound to be something you’re interested in. You can recommend something by leaving a comment below or speak with us.


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