Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘Harvard referencing system

Cite Them RightWe were recently asked to provide referencing revision sessions across all our longer courses as tutors felt it would be a timely reminder half way through the year.

Despite knowing about online referencing generators, Learning Resources have been reluctant to teach to any particular one as none seemed to match what we taught and we felt it would only confuse students. However, our research continued and we are now promoting RefMe. This is freely available on the desktop and as a mobile app. We particularly like this generator because when students select the Harvard style, it relates specifically to Cite them right 9th edition by Pears and Shields and published by Palgrave. This is the style we teach across the college. Data can be generated digitally (through a dropdown selection) or manually and students can generate multiple bibliographies, all saved on the cloud.

Our level 2 sessions were evaluated using electronic post-it notes provided by Linoit. Here is a selection of student comments (thank you for being guinea pigs) which were all very positive:

  • This is really cool. I won’t lose track of my references
  • RefMe makes life easy
  • It is a time saver. It will make my references very clear to read. It shows I am not plagiarising
  • It will help me to be organised
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Cite Them RightLast week our LRC Manager was helping our Preaccess students complete their referencing for their Information Communications Technology (ICT)/Biology assignment. Many of the students had got links from websites but weren’t sure how to reference them and they were struggling with the websites trying to work out what the title was and the publication date.

Pears and Shields Cite Them Right gives you all the advice you need on how to create a reference for a website. It’s especially handy when you cannot find the author or date on the website and advises you what to do in the body of your essay and on a reference list. In the latest edition you’ll find referencing has gotten shorter – you don’t need to put [Online] in like you used to in the past. Referencing and Plagiarism by Kate Williams and Jude Carroll has a great graphic showing you the elements you’ll need online to form your reference.

If you’re getting mixed up about what order all the elements go in then just keep in mind  ‘It’s an author + date system’, as our LRC Assistant says. That immediately should trigger that you need the author to come first and then the date.

 

Catalogue pcIt’s half term this week so the Learning Resources team have been beavering away creating Learning Objects with Xerte Online Toolkits to reinforce the inductions we’ve been doing with Access to Higher Education and Preaccess students on referencing and copyright.

The great thing about using Xerte to do this is it has built-in disability features so students using them can change the font size and the colour to suit their needs. Plus we can plug in audio, images and much more. We’ve started off with some fill the gaps and categories for referencing and for copyright we’ve tried the multiple choice quizzes. We’ve found it great fun adding in feedback for the multiple choice.  Find out more about what you can do with Xerte and examples of Learning Objects on the University of Nottingham’s Resources page.

Once the learning objects are ready we’re embedding them onto our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) pages so our students can do them on and offsite. If you are one of students or tutors you can see what we’ve done on the LRC Referencing and Plagiarism page.

Shelf of books with ebookThis week the Learning Resources team have been continuing the induction programme for our Access to Higher Education and Preaccess students. We’ve been demonstrating the joys of using ebooks and how to do Harvard referencing.

As a student it’s often easy to make notes on what you’re reading then be unable to unscramble your handwriting later when it comes to writing your essay, putting in your references and creating a bibliography. Ebooks on Dawsonera make it an easy job by allowing you to create notes and save them on individual ebooks as you read them. And they don’t disappear unless you delete them.

Find out why ebooks are just the ticket on our GoAnimate video Don’t Scuff the Books Use Ebooks animation. You’ll find out you can make your librarian’s day!

Library display at Northampton CollegeLast week the Learning Resources Centre (LRC) team attended the Council for Learning Resources in Colleges (CoLRiC) roadshow on Information Literacy at Northampton College. As well as having a tour of the Beacon award winning Library we took part in some practical sessions on referencing material.

Back in the day of the LRC team referencing was easy – books, journals and newspapers. These days our students need to reference not only their tutors notes but also blogs, images on the Web, wikis, discussion forums and more!

Our session by Abigail Cuthbertson from Huntingdonshire Regional College  on Using Xerte for esafety and information literacy got us being the students working our way through how to reference and avoid plagiarising material. Abigail put us on to Anglia Ruskin University Library’s Harvard System – a handy web page guide to referencing your research. Find out more about the work Abigail has done on information literacy on her Slideshare presentation Huntingdonshire Regional College’s Journey with Information Literacy and  E-safety.


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