Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘films

Of Mice and MenOur GCSE English students on Preaccess A and B are studying John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men. We’ve done some research on supporting material for students and found a recording of Steinbeck on YouTube discussing Of Mice and Men and Grapes of Wrath.

For anyone doing an assignment for GCSE BBC Bitesize – Of Mice and Men has some handy links with character information, plot summary, themes and videos.

In the LRC we also have copies of:

Wnat to know more about Steinbeck’s characters from  his novels? Take a look at the Library of Congress’s John Steinbeck Map of America on the American Treasures of the Library of Congress. The map by Molly Maguire has pictures of characters and numbers on the map to indicate which novel they appear in.

If you’re into apps there’s a free download from the National Theatre with interviews with the cast James Franco and Chris O’Dowd and a Revise Of Mice and Men app on Appcrawlr.

Last but not least there’s an interview with a volunteer archivist at the National Steinbeck Center on the Authors Road: John Steinbeck, Novelist and More

We have been busy searching for and ordering DVDs that feature brilliant actors such as Julie Christie and Glenn Close in their later years. Media representations of older people can be mainly of stereotypes, such as the grumpy old man or the nice little old lady. These films go beyond the stereotypes and open our world to view from different perspectives. Many books and films use the story-telling device of having an older person looking back on their youth and the events that happened to them. These movies don’t do that, they focus on the present time of the characters and what happens after or approaching retirement age.

The themes that they cover include loyalty, the autumn of life and separation of loved ones through death and traumatic experiences. ‘Away from Her’, ‘Still Mine’ and ‘Poetry’ also deal with the difficult subject of Alzheimer’s disease (a form of dementia). ‘Albert Nobbs’ is about a butler who wants to get away from his job in which he has had to pretend to be a man for 30 years. It’s not all doom and gloom though as ‘The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel’ paints a humourous portrait of older people from Britain adapting to new situations in India.

You can borrow up to 3 DVDs (free of charge) during staffed hours 9.00am-5.30pm, Monday to Friday. We have many more you can browse too, there’s bound to be something you’re interested in. You can recommend something by leaving a comment below or speak with us.


DVD triangle
The British Film Institute (BFI) has launched five films from the London Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender film festival Flare onto its BFI Player for you to watch for free. The five films look at the theme of love as a basic human right. The British Council is also promoting the films globally in countries like China, India, Ukraine, Poland and Israel.

The festival runs over 10 days starting on 19 March 2015. Each of the films will be available each day on the BFI Player. Wednesday 25 March is a ‘fivefilms4 freedom’ day dedicated to everyone using social media to view the films at the same time. The films are:

Chance –  two older men  finding love after meeting accidentally in a park
Code Academy – a girl takes on the persona of a boy in cyberspace to get the girl of her dreams
Morning is Broken – coming of age story in rural England
True Wheel – documentary about a bicycle workshop for the city’s gay, transgender and women’s communities in Detroit
An Afternoon – a teenage boy summons up the confidence to tell another boy how he feels about him.

Look Back in Anger play, DVD and literary criticismOur Access to Higher Education students are  studying John Osborne’s play Look Back in Anger as part of their literature course.

We’ve got two DVD versions of Osborne’s play which students can borrow from the Learning Resources Centre ( LRC ) directed by Judi Dench and Tony Richardson. The Judi Dench TV film is available on YouTube. As is the Tony Richardson version split into two parts; 12, 3 and 4. There is an interview with Osborne broadcast in 1957 on ITV. You can also watch a Tony Palmer programme on the playwright John Osborne – The Gift of Friendship.

We’ve also got copies of the play to borrow and an audio CD of the LA Theatre Works production of the play directed by Rosalind Ayres and the literary criticism by Aleks Sierz called John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger. On the Internet you’ll find a literary guide on GradeSaver.

If you fancy a trip to see his first editions, uncorrected proofs and ephemera related to the launch of his films visit the British Library’s John Osborne page and you’ll also find a link to his papers in the Harry Ransom Humanities Center in Austin, Texas.

Stack of DVDsThis month we’ve bought in some new DVDs for our students and staff to borrow.

Two are on a women’s theme:

Marie Antoinette  is directed by Sofia Coppola and charts the life of the French Queen from her arrival at Versailles to the French revolution.

Age of Innocence is based on Edith Wharton’s novel of intrigue and infidelity in nineteenth century New York

We’ve also got the film voted in by our students from book selections for the Six Book Challenge:

One Day – charts the lives of two students who meet on graduation and remain a constant to each other as they fall in and out of love during the 1980s.

 


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