Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘feminism

This Monday was International Women’s Day. We celebrate women’s achievements every IMG_0012day at Hillcroft College but this is an annual occasion when we can highlight women who inspire us and draw attention to gender inequalities. Names that have been put forward this week for special mention are: Anne Frank, Mary Wollstonecraft and Hildegard of Bingen. The Open University have created an interactive map showing world-changing women because women are not as visible in history. In the LRC are resources that give voices to women whose lives are remarkable in ways that wouldn’t normally make the history books or be given screen time.

Here are our top 5 resources for finding out more about women’s experiences and strength against opposition and/or oppression:

  1. ‘If you knew me you would care’ by Zainab Salbi and photographs by Rennio Maifredi. (Pictured)
  2. ‘Everyday sexism’ by Laura Bates.
  3. ‘Laughing all the way to the mosque’ by Zarqa Nawaz.
  4. ‘A Passion for Birth’ by Sheila Kitzinger.
  5. ‘The Gold Diggers’ directed by Sally Potter.

 

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Feminist writersDid you know that BBC Radio 4 are running a season on feminist writing from the 1970s to the present day? It’s called Riot Girls.

You can catch up with broadcasts on BBC iPlayer.

The season includes Fay Weldon’s The Lives and Loves of a She Devil. The next episode is 2100 on Saturday 27 February. There is a set of 3 plays called Katy charting the feminist movement across three generations of women. Plus there’s Erica Jong’s Fear of Flying which is running in 5 episodes examining a young woman’s sexual liberation which was published in 1973. The next episode is today at 1945.

This year is the bicentenary of Charlotte Bronte’s birth. For our Access to Higher Education Humanities and Social Science students Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre in the Fifteen Minute Drama slot will be broadcasting on Radio 4 next week at 1045.  There’s a In Our Time episode on Jane Eyre on BBC iPlayer too. Our learners compare Bronte’s novel with Jean Rhys Wide Sargasso Sea. Spark Notes gives you a summary of the plot and analyses themes and characters. As it does for Jane Eyre too.

Political women biographiesYou may have caught BBC2’s Hillary Clinton: the Power of Women which was broadcast on 25 March 2015. The programme looked at whether women’s situation in society has changed since Clinton made a speech expressing womens rights are a human right. Their rights are seen through the eyes of three other powerful women; former United States Secretary of States Hillary Clinton, Madeleine Albright and Condolezza Rice as well as women in Afghanistan, Egypt, India and Liberia who have tried to make the changes.

If you’d like to find out more about Hillary Clinton we have these biographies in our Learning Resources Centre:

A Woman in Charge: the Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton by Carl Bernstein

Hillary Clinton by Michael Burgan (easy read)

If you’re interested in more on women politicians take a look at :

Momentum: the Struggle for Peace, Politics and the People by Mo Mowlam

Everybody Matters: a Memoir by Mary Robinson

Baroness Scotland of Asthal by Sue Adler (easy read)

Dilma Rousseff by Catherine Chambers (easy read)

The Lady and the Peacock: the Life of Aung San Suu Kyi by Peter Popham

Angela Merkel by Claire Throp (easy read)

 

Votes for Women materialToday 25 February a new series starts on BBC2 called Suffragettes, For Ever! The Story of Women and Power. It’s a 3-part series looking at the beginnings of the suffragette movement fighting for women’s rights to vote going right up to the battles of the twentieth century for equality.

To chart the history Amanda Vickery looks at women’s legal rights from the eighteenth century before the suffragettes began. You can catch clips of episode 1 on the BBC Two Suffragettes For Ever! The Story of Women and Power Episode 1 page.

Our Access to Humanities and Social Science students have just finished studying the suffragette movement. Here’s an embedded search to our library catalogue to find out what we have on the suffragettes. It includes ebooks, TV recordings, DVDs and websites Or you can take a look at what we hold on women and equality.

We have been updating the VLE calendar and the YELLOW FOLDER with events going on next month. It is fun to find out all the exciting things you can do – often for only a tenner or for free!

It’s International Women’s Day on the 8th March so there are lots of cultural events going on to celebrate and support women.

The Southbank Centre has a whole host of great speakers and guests, performances and comedy shows as part of the WoW Festival. It stands for Women of the World – and the whole world wants to be there! I am particularly interested in the debate on What will the next government do for women? It’s on at 7.45 on Monday 2nd March. I now need to book a couple of tickets before you all jump on it! You can follow all the action on Twitter or Facebook searching the hashtag .

The Museum of London Docklands is also putting on a family weekend event on the Saturday 7th March. Rich Mix in the East End has a poetry reading on 6th March – but don’t yawn – it sounds like it will be a really exciting and unusual take on poetry. It is run by Scottee who, according to the website plumpf, “a dyslexic who thinks poems should rhyme.” Intriguing!

If there are any events going on in the nearby area to Surbiton I will be on the lookout, but please let us know of anything that might appeal to the wonderful women of Hillcroft.

Yellow WallpaperOur Access to Higher Education students are doing two pieces of American literature for their English module. They are reading Turn of the Screw and The Yellow Wall paper.

Project Gutenberg is a free source of ebooks available in different formats like ePub, html and Kindle which you can download and use on ereaders or use with adaptive technology like Natural Reader if you have for example dyslexia. There’s an audio version of the Henry James’s Turn of the Screw on there too. There’s another audio book version on YouTube broken down into parts. Here is Part I.They’ve also got the BBC version of the book adapted for television starring Downton Abbey’s Michelle Dockery.

Discover more about Henry James and test yourself on the Literature Network’s Henry James page. There’s also a Henry James page on the Literary Gothic website with useful links to other works, ebooks, information about the author and analyses. There’s critical analyses of Jame’s novella on SparkNotes: The Turn of the Screw and Shmoop. Take a look at historical literary critiques of the work on The Turn of the Screw website.

You’ll find an audiobook version of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper on YouTube as well as a PBS Masterpiece Theatre film divided into multiparts. Here is Part I and II. There’s an ebook version on Project Gutenberg.

All literature students need some critical analysis of what they read to look at the style, themes, characters and the plot. SparkNotes has the Yellow Wallpaper online as does Shmoop. Find out more about Charlotte Perkins Gilman and try out an online quiz on the Literature Network’s Charlotte Perkins Gilman page. There’s also more about her on the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard  University’s From Woman to Human: the Life and Works of Charlotte Perkins Gilman page.

In our Learning Resource Centre we’ve got copies of:

Wild Unrest: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and the making of “The yellow wallpaper” by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz

Jame’s Turn of the Screw by Leonard Orr

Turn of the Screw directed by Tim Fywell

Much Ado About Nothing and Shakespeare, Feminism and Gender coversOur Access to Higher Education students are in the process of writing assignments on Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing at present.

Each student is researching away trying to find new sources and angles on the play and its themes to stand out from the others. Whilst we’ve got an ebook version of a  Harold Bloom’s literacy criticism Much Ado About Nothing to help them we’ve also got a copy of Kate Chedgzoy’s Shakespeare, Feminism and Gender which looks at the role and view of women in the play.

While working with them in Learning Zone this week and discussing the role of Hero in the play and the significance of her name our Learning Resource Centre (LRC) staff member suggested they might find something interesting about it on Britannica Online. As well as using the literature dictionaries we have. Britannica came up trumps with a reference to Greek mythology.

As a librarian our Learning Resource Centre team member found yet again by thinking laterally about the sources you could use for an assignment on Shakespeare it was possible to get a different angle on the play without spending hours running Google searches to find a quality and useful source to impress…


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