Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘copyright

Freebooting and Facebook sitting in a tree, piracy is rife and woe be we. In all seriousness though there are reasons why watching videos on Facebook or other social media website might be aiding the wrong people. “What is freebooting?” I hear you ask. This article on Social Media Examiner says it is a form of video piracy, usually taking someone’s else’s Youtube video and uploading it to Facebook without asking permission or saying whose work it is.

You know about academic copyright from being in college, but how about the copyright implications of sharing cat videos?The internet expands the ability to create and share information with millions of people. Copyright law impacts not just in the academic setting but in the everyday setting too – people need to give permission to share their work and have their work attributed to them. Smartereveryday uses a metaphor with sheep and rich men to explain how Facebook don’t care about video piracy and how Youtube video creators’ livelihoods are affected (with some insights from some very smart kids). Watch the video below to find out more about freebooting and what you can do to help creators:

Woman with camera

Woman with camera (Domenico 2014)

Finding images for projects and assignments that are not under strict copyright restrictions needn’t be a headache.

The ‘Unsplash‘ website has many Creative Commons Zero high-resolution photographs for anyone to download and reuse (even for commercial purposes). This means that as long as you cite the photograph then you can place it in your work. The creators have waived their rights to their photographs.

Unsplash’s online collection includes photographs of buildings, food, computers, forests and other natural places. It is not possible to search for images, but they are aimed at being able to illustrate lots of different topics or just add a touch of attractiveness. They add  10 new photographs every 10 days. It is nice not to be overwhelmed with images as with other image databases.

I came across the Unsplash site through Phil Bradley’s library blog which highlights loads of websites, great internet tools and apps that you might also be interested in.

Pears and Shields (2013) give an outline for how to cite photographs from the internet:

  • Photographer
  • Year of publication (in round brackets).
  • Title of photograph (in italics).
  • Available at: URL.
  • (Accessed/downloaded: date).

For example: Domenico, M. (2014) Untitled. Available at: https://unsplash.com/miadomenico (Accessed: 21 November 2014).


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