Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘confidence

Presentation and interview booksI was intrigued this week listening to Thursday 26 January’s episode of Thought for the Day on BBC Radio 4. It was about how the actor Orlando Bloom was flying to Manchester to help comprehensive school pupils in Cheshire learn acting skills. Orlando is teaching them how to use their voice and act. He is honing  skills that will help them present themselves well at job or university interviews. These are the kind of skills which are often neglected and help boost your confidence in communicating with others.

Orlando like many of our students has dyslexia and the acting skills helped him boost his confidence and communicate more easily with others. Although many would think acting is a way of hiding the inner self, it is in fact is a way of helping you bridge the gap in your lack of confidence and performance so you can impress your interviewers.

Our Learning Resources Centre has a number of books that will help you further with this. Here are some of our latest ones:

Posters and Presentations by Emily Blethell and Clare Milsom

Develop Your Presentation Skills by Theo Theobald

Brilliant Presentation: What the Best Presenters Know, Do and Say by Richard Hall

The Job Interview Toolkit: Excercises to Get You Fit for Your Interview by Ann Reynolds and Julie Cooper

The Interview Book : How to Prepare and Perform at Your Best in Any Interview by James Innes

 

 

 

Brainstorm on paperIt’s already midway through January 2016! Have you got more resolutions than ever to fulfill but no idea where to start? We’ve got some handy books to help you be more productive and achieve in academic and personal goals.

How about learning better ways to brainstorm or create lists? Check out: ‘How to get your own way‘ by Craig Shrives and Paul Easter. They also look at developing an argument and common fallacies. These ideas would be useful in essay-writing, presentations and everyday life. It is great when you can apply knowledge to different tasks and situations. There is also a good chapter looking at statistics and how numbers can be used to alter our perceptions.

If you want everyday psychological tools you could borrow ‘The Tools‘ by Phil Stutz and Barry Michels. They give you methods to combat negativity, worry and lack of confidence. Tips and tricks learnt through self-improvement books (aka ‘shelf-help’) can impact on many aspects of life, not least education.

Reading Ahead posterOn Wednesday 24 June we passed over Six Book Challenge certificates to our students from Future Proof/Next Level and Dyslexia: Reading at our Diversity and Achievement Day. They’ve done a great job reading 6 items each and reviewing them ahead of the 29 June national deadline for the prize draw. We’ll be entering their names for the prize draw. If they win they will get a free trip to London with a friend. There is also the chance to win Kobo Touch ereaders.

Six Book Challenge helps adults boost their reading skills, gain confidence and read more. This is the end of our third year of the programme and it’s a delight talking to students about their reviews and giving them a sticker of their choice as they review each item.

The Reading Agency who run the Six Book Challenge reading programme have renamed and rebranded the programme for next year. It will now be known as Reading Ahead. Same format – just an emphasis that one of the six items you read can be anything from a website to a leaflet, to a recipe, or a magazine article, poem, email or book. We’ll be getting some of the new promotional material ready for starting it in our autumn 2015 term. Find out what Hillcroft College: courses are coming up at Hillcroft on our website.

If you’ve got a child then look out for local public libraries running the Summer Reading Challenge to keep up their reading over the school break. Kingston Libraries local to our college are running this for kids and for adults.

 

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Astrodeep by Rich Murray is licensed under CC BY 2.0

I read this article today in The Independent newspaper (available in the LRC) on women and science. According to research, women overestimate the need to be naturally brilliant to succeed in science and engineering. This conclusion follows from research carried out into why so few women do engineering, technology and science degrees and even fewer progress further into such fields. It seems women feel less confident in their instant intellectual abilities.

This is compounded by images in the media portraying geniuses like Sherlock Holmes who when faced with a problem immediately solve it and don’t need to work long and hard at it. I watched the film ‘Theory of Everything’ recently and Stephen Hawking is shown in the lab writing complex maths formulae all across the blackboard. He is just naturally brilliant at physics. But hard work is important too.

Hopefully we can find ways to encourage women and men to challenge themselves with subjects that seem out of reach. There are lots of ways to find out more about subjects before deciding to go to university. For example, University College London holds weekly free lectures in science for everyone to attend. The next one is called ‘Auroras Abound – Comparing the Northern Lights of Earth, Jupiter and Saturn’ on Friday, 23rd January. Does this kind of lecture interest you?

Britannica displayThis week our Access to Higher Education students are finishing off their course work on Human Biology. They’ve been looking at how viruses spread as wells as fungi and other parasites and how they develop.

As usual there is a wealth of material on our library catalogue to help them. This academic year we’ve been showing them how to use Britannica Academic Online which not only has regular encylopedia definitions of terms but also comes with embedded videos and scholarly academic articles too.

The Learning Resources team have been themselves somewhat under the microscope this week as Ofsted have been assessing our impact on learners and also our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). This has given us the chance to show how we respond to our learners’ requests for material in different formats (DVDs, audio CDs) as well as suggestions for science fiction  and confidence material, biographies, books on other countries as well as short stories. We have been reinforcing the skills we teach in inductions (using ebooks, referencing, copyright and plagiarism) through the use of Vokis, GoAnimate, Xerte learning objects and quizzes on the VLE. And in doing so boosting their functional skills in using Information Technology.

Self-help material - Susan Jeffers and Louise L. HayHere at our Hillcroft College we frequently run courses with confidence building in them and our students tell us they want more of it. And they’d also like more self-help material in our Learning Resources Centre.

Following their feedback we’ve been boosting up our material on confidence, positive thinking and overcoming anxiety and fear.

So here’s our pick of what we have so far – with material by Susan Jeffers and Louise L. Hay. We’ve got them in audio and print to suit our learners. They come with tips to help you think positively through mantras, meditation and positive visualisation.

Susan Jeffers and Louise L. Hay both have inspiring websites to take you further on your journey with daily affirmations.


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