Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘borrowing

Reading Well pile of books

We are in the process of adding titles from the Reading Agency’s Reading Well book selection into our library.

Health professionals and young people have recommended the books on the Reading Well. The books help you combat anxiety, depression, lack of confidence, stress, bullying and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

 

Here are the latest arrivals from the list which are on our shelves for you to borrow:

Kite Spirit by Sita Bramacharmi

The Self-Esteem Team’s Guide to Sex, Drugs and WTFs!! by Grace Barrett

House of Windows by Alexia Casale

Quiet the Mind: an Illustrated Guide on How to Meditate by Matthew Johnstone

Everyday by David Levithan

Blame My Brain  – the Amazing Teenage Brain Revealed by Nicola Morgan

I’ll Give Your the Sun by Jandy Nelson

We’ll post again when the next batch of titles have been added to our book shelves.

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Books can be heavy, notes get lost and eyes get tired. On all these issues, ebooks can help. Reading a book on a screen may not have the same satisfaction as holding a physical copy.  Yet there are benefits to having access to books stored in the “cloud“.

Differences between ebooks and reading apps

What makes a reading app an app rather than an ebook? There aren’t many differences between reading apps and ebooks. For those who are curious about such things, one distinction is that ebooks tend to be downloadable and have copies exist in physical form, whereas reading apps are more likely to be ‘born digital’, that is, having no physical manifestation (at least to begin with). Reading apps and ebooks these days might mix text with interaction and features of other media such as video, audio and games.

Benefits of ebooks and reading apps

  • not needing to carry a book around,
  • having a choice of things to read between,
  • being able to read without hands with the help of a screenreader such as the freebie Natural Reader or VoiceOver on Macs,
  • have your device record how much you’ve read.

We have two ebook platforms available through the catalogue for subjects including maths, social sciences and English.

If you are after fiction you may want other apps on your smartphone for easy access.

3 Free Reading apps

There are a number of reading apps to add to your phone for free, much of the content is free too. It depends on how you like your reading experience but it’s always good to have a book available on your smartphone if you’ve got one.

Perhaps try The Pigeonhole which releases ebooks in installments so it’s more digestible for on-the-go reading.

There is also the Kindle reading app so you can get all the out-of-copyright ebooks downloaded on your phone or tablet or desktop.

I’ve also heard of the app Hooked which present stories as a chat conversation.

Like, you know, super spooky.

Don’t forget your public library will have ebooks available to borrow.

Let us know what reading apps you’ve heard of or would like to try out. What combo of apps vs print works for you?

 

 

Much Ado About Nothing and Buffy the Vampire slayer graphic novelsEarlier this academic year our Six Book Challenge students took part in voting for books they’d like to see us stock to count towards the Challenge.

One of them who has recently completed the Challenge told me how she’d loved reading the Manga Shakespeare Much Ado About Nothing edited by Richard Appignanesi. Since she finished the Challenge we’ve added Romeo and Juliet to our stock too. If you’re into graphic Shakespeare then why not try Macbeth by William Shakespeare edited by John McDonald?

If you’re a fan of Manga then you’ll also like these graphic novels:

Adamtine by Hannah Berry

Fables: Rose Red by Bill Willingham

Fables: Arabian Nights (and Days) by Bill Willingham

Buffy the Vampire Slayer- Time of Your Life by Joss Whedon

Graphic doesn’t necessarily mean it only applies to plays and novels. We’ve got some graphic books for students studying for Access to Higher Education:

Introducing Psychology: a Graphic Guide by Nigel C. Benson

Sociology in Pictures: Research Methods by Michael Haralambos and Wendy Hope