Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘BBC iPlayer

"Well-behaved women seldom make history"I’ve been watching the BBC’s ‘Versailles’ series on iPlayer which has lead me to Google whether it or not some things actually happened or were dramatised versions of events. Changing history. Humanity likes to gloss over the past or adjust it to make it more palatable or suit the agenda of the present (in ‘Versailles’ case – to entertain). This happens most famously in George Orwell‘s 1984 on an industrial scale:

“He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.” – George Orwell, ‘1984’.

Women have been left out of much of history (and quotations). Things are changing as there are more books and articles written by and focusing on women who have changed the world. That’s why first-hand accounts and primary sources are so vital for historians to re-examine the past.

Here’s an authoritative list of history websites compiled by Oxford Quick Reference to accompany the Oxford Dictionary of World History:

http://www.oxfordreference.com/page/worldhist

You’ll also find women feature prominently in our print biographies and main collection.

Don’t discount your skills in investigating inaccuracies and overlooked facts and figures – they are not confined to the classroom. It is more important to use your critical thinking skills in everyday life, in reading the news and participating in society. Seeing connections, questioning potential bias, probing the facts and respecting evidence. Women can change history in a good way starting with you and me.

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Jean Rhys and Charlotte Bronte Wide Sargasso Sea and Jane Eyre DVD book and audio CDThis week our Access to Higher Education Humanities and Social Sciences students have started reading Jean Rhys’s novel the Wide Sargasso Sea. One of the students was asking me if there are any online literary criticism notes to help with novel. There are two free online from Shmoop and Spark Notes. We have a paper copy of Carl Plasa’s Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea in the Learning Resources Centre for students to borrow too.

Many of our students also find it useful to watch a DVD version of novels and plays they study. We have the Wide Sargasso Sea directed by Brendan Maher which was originally broadcast on BBC television. In addition there is a recording of a BBC Radio 3 broadcast from the 17 January 2016 which you can listen to on BBC iPlayer called the Sunday Feature, Literary Pursuits, Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea which uncovers the story behind the novel.

Our students read Rhys’s novel in tandem with Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. Take a look at our 24 February blog post for more links on Jane Eyre material to match. Plus as this year marks the bicentenary of Charlotte Brontë’s birth there is the BBC programme Being the Brontës which was broadcast over Easter which you can rewind on the BBC iPlayer.

 

PoppyThe LRC team has keenly been recording the latest programmes from the World War I season on BBC 2 over the past few weeks. These include:

The World’s War: Forgotten Soldiers of Empire

which explored the recruitment and deployment of soldiers from Africa, India and Asia by the British, French and Germans on the Western Front and throughout the empire.

Our Access to Higher Education Humanities and Social Science students examine the role of women in the First World in the context of the fight for women’s right to vote. BBC 2’s broadcast of Kate Adie’s Women of World War One focused on how the suffragettes gave up their struggle for votes to work for the war effort.

Our students also look at the Raj and slave trade as part of their history programme. The opening of the Black Cultural Archives in Brixton will be a great supplement to their studies. The current exhibition is Re-imagine: Black Women in Britain running until 30 November with free entry. Plus you can explore their catalogue of resources online.

DVD stand close upAs the only national residential college for women we keep our eye on television TV programmes focussing on women and women’s issue. Over the past few weeks we’ve been recording two interesting BBC2 programmes. Our ERA licence allows us to record TV that students can borrow and staff can use in the classroom.

Blurred Lines:  the New Battle of the Sexes presented by Kirsty Walk looked at cultural changes which have allowed men to discuss, write and feature women in a sexist and provocative manner. Looks back at Germaine Greer’s 1970s book The Female Eunuch and asks what has made these changes take place. Focuses on the lad culture of the 1990s and the present day and recent cases of Internet trolling. Examines the portrayal of women on the Internet and in gaming.

Pop Go the Women: the Other Story of Pop Art – Culture Show Special discusses women artists involved in the pop art movement from during the 1950s and 1960s. Presented by Alastair Sooke the programme looked at Idelle Weber, Pauline Boty, Jann Hawarth, Marisol, Letty Lou Eisenhauer and Rosalyn Drexler. It investigated how these artists have fallen off the pop art map.

You can catch both progammes on the BBC iPlayer.


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