Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘Arts

 

aesthetica online archives

Good news! Our subscription to Aesthetica arts magazine has been renewed.

The magazine has lots of great visual culture including photography, fashion, architecture and fine art. It comes out 4 times a year (‘quarterly’ in librarian-speak). Find it in the LRC on the journals stand.

You can also delve into the online archives any time through our library account. Browse the pictures to your heart’s content and see the world through artists’ eyes (always an interesting perspective!). Find the username and password on VLE under LRC –> eresources (then the eresources book).

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Black and British Season BBC WebsiteOver the past month the BBC has been running a series of programmes on black history as part of its Black and British season looking at the lives of black women and men in the United Kingdom in the past and present.

We’ve used our ERA licence to record a number of programmes from the season for our learners. To match in with our Access to Humanities and Social Sciences students who are studying the slave trade we’ve recorded David Olosuga’s series Black and British – a Forgotten History which comes in four parts; First Encounters, Freedom, Moral mission and Homecoming. The series goes back to Roman times and takes you up to the present day.

Black is the New Black is also a four-part piece looking at the lives and family history of famous black Britons from the arts, sport, comedy, politics, business, design, fashion, science and architecture.

We’ve also recorded Black Nurses: the Women Who Saved the NHS and Will Britain Ever Have a Black Prime Minister?

Jane Austen booksFor our display for International Women’s Day, we had to narrow down our selection of inspirational women to just ten. We had a science theme so many of the women who made waves in the arts and humanities were left out. With a couple of students commenting on the absence of the author Jane Austen, it made us think about this inspirational woman in particular.

According to the website Biography.com Jane didn’t receive much recognition during her lifetime and that it was only in the 1920s that people began to see her six works of fiction as genius. In Tomalin’s biography of Austen (2000 p. 11) she informs us that “Jane Austen’s novels do not ramble”. Her wit and observations into society are remarkable as well as her tightly-woven plots. You can find her writing and adaptations of her work in the LRC by searching the catalogue for “Jane Austen”. The BBC’s TV adaptation of Pride and Prejudice is one of the most loved of all. The novel was originally titled “First Impressions” whilst Northanger Abbey was first called ‘Susan’.

December 16th is Jane Austen Day in celebration of her lasting influence. Most events take place in Bath, where she once lived. If you can’t wait that long to start finding out about Jane and her world, you can also read the online magazine about all things regency (food, fashion, history).

Jane Austen has been in the news recently as a picture of Jane will replace that of Charles Darwin on the £10 note. This was after a campaign led by journalist and feminist activist Caroline Criado-Perez which brought the lack of women on bank notes to the attention of the Bank of England (and the world). The irony is that Jane sold Northanger Abbey to the publisher for £10 in 1803 (see entry for Jane Austen in Encyclopaedia Britannica) which according to the National Archives currency converter would be about £330 in the modern day. Not very much money at all! If only we could go back in time and let her know how priceless her work is.

Which other women do you feel should have made our inspirational women poster or feature more in our everyday lives?

Much Ado About Nothing and Shakespeare, Feminism and Gender coversOur Access to Higher Education students are in the process of writing assignments on Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing at present.

Each student is researching away trying to find new sources and angles on the play and its themes to stand out from the others. Whilst we’ve got an ebook version of a  Harold Bloom’s literacy criticism Much Ado About Nothing to help them we’ve also got a copy of Kate Chedgzoy’s Shakespeare, Feminism and Gender which looks at the role and view of women in the play.

While working with them in Learning Zone this week and discussing the role of Hero in the play and the significance of her name our Learning Resource Centre (LRC) staff member suggested they might find something interesting about it on Britannica Online. As well as using the literature dictionaries we have. Britannica came up trumps with a reference to Greek mythology.

As a librarian our Learning Resource Centre team member found yet again by thinking laterally about the sources you could use for an assignment on Shakespeare it was possible to get a different angle on the play without spending hours running Google searches to find a quality and useful source to impress…


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