Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘art

ESOL Summer school artworkThis week has been the ESOL summer school. We used iPads to explore art apps on Monday. These apps are:

We had some wonderful student presentations comparing two pieces of artwork through browsing the apps for striking images. The advantage of these apps is that you don’t need to create an account to browse artwork. You can mark your favourite pictures with a heart (Wikiart) or a star (Landscape Art). You can also download pictures from the Landscape Art app to the iPad. What’s more, they are both free! Wikiart is related to Wikipedia so you can find out more about artists from around the world.

On Wednesday was a trip to London, ESOL students were tour guides to iconic buildings such as Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, the London Eye, Trafalgar Square and St. James’ Park. We learnt a lot and everyone enjoyed the freedom to roam. The videos from the trip can be found on the ‘video’ section on Office 365.

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Grayson Perry trail and National Portrait Gallery brochureAs a college Hillcroft aims to reflect the diverse background of its learners and staff. Our Access to Higher Education: Humanities and Social Science students look at identity as part of their Psychology and Sociology units. If you’re interested in diversity and equality then you’ll like the Turner Prize winning artist Grayson Perry’s exhibition Who Are You? running until 15 March 2014 at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

The exhibition follows the 14 items in the exhibition which appeared in the Channel 4 programme Grayson Perry: Who Are You? broadcast this autumn. They include a poster representing the identity and beliefs of a deaf community group, a Benin-styled statue of Peter Pan depicting a female to male transsexual and a young British woman from Kent who has converted to Islam encapsulated in a silk Hijab. Plus 3 statues of women from a women’s group which supports so called obese women. One of Perry’s signature ceramic pots portrays a gay couple who have adopted a mixed race child. You can follow Grayson’s trail of works at the National Portrait Gallery.

If you’d like to find out more about the artwork go through backruns of the TV programme by visiting 4oD.

At the same time the National Portrait Gallery is displaying Suffragettes: Deeds Not Words examining how the suffragette movement spent the summer of 1914 increasing their fight for the vote and protesting against the Cat and Mouse Act up. The display runs up to 10 May 2015.

Both the exhibition and the display offer free entry.

Gothic literature and Angela Carter coversOur Access to Higher Education Humanities and Social Science students are studying Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber and other novels on a Gothic theme. We’ve already supplied them with the Company of Wolves film on DVD and copies of Gothic Literature and  The Fiction of Angela Carter: a Reader’s Essential Criticism by Sarah Gamble and Gothic Literature by Sue Chaplin. Both the BBC and the British Library are launching a focus of programmes and exhibition around the gothic.

Terror and Wonder: the Gothic Imagination from 3 October 2014 to 30 January 2015 at the British Library looks at Gothic literature, film and design influences from early literature by Walpole and Shelley to the films of Stanley Kubrick and the designs of Alexander McQueen. The British Library also has a page dedicated to Gothic Literature.

The BBC is starting a season called When Gothic Was Born. BBC4 begins next week with Andrew Graham-Dixon’s programme The Art of Gothic: Britain’s Midnight Hour on Monday 20 October @ 2100 followed by Dan Cruickshank on the architecture of Sir George Gilbert Scott and Giles Gilbert Scott  in Dan Cruickshank and the Family That Built Gothic Britain on Tuesday 21 October @ 2100. The season also covers film too.

 

 

DVD stand close upAs the only national residential college for women we keep our eye on television TV programmes focussing on women and women’s issue. Over the past few weeks we’ve been recording two interesting BBC2 programmes. Our ERA licence allows us to record TV that students can borrow and staff can use in the classroom.

Blurred Lines:  the New Battle of the Sexes presented by Kirsty Walk looked at cultural changes which have allowed men to discuss, write and feature women in a sexist and provocative manner. Looks back at Germaine Greer’s 1970s book The Female Eunuch and asks what has made these changes take place. Focuses on the lad culture of the 1990s and the present day and recent cases of Internet trolling. Examines the portrayal of women on the Internet and in gaming.

Pop Go the Women: the Other Story of Pop Art – Culture Show Special discusses women artists involved in the pop art movement from during the 1950s and 1960s. Presented by Alastair Sooke the programme looked at Idelle Weber, Pauline Boty, Jann Hawarth, Marisol, Letty Lou Eisenhauer and Rosalyn Drexler. It investigated how these artists have fallen off the pop art map.

You can catch both progammes on the BBC iPlayer.

Feminist writers French and EnglishAs the national residential college for women we collect material on women’s history, women’s rights and feminism. So as you can imagine we were delighted to get a postcard from the British Library alerting us to a new oral history resource called Sisterhood and after: an oral history of the Women’s Liberation Movement.

Sisterhood charts the history of the Women’s Liberation Movement in the United Kingdom from the 1960s to 1980s through oral testimonies. It’s broken down into themes; family and children, mind, body and spirit, sex, love and friendship, race, place and nation, education,equality and work, activism, politics and legislation, change, culture and art and who we were, how we are.  It also includes biographies of the participants and a timeline.

With British Library permission granted you’ll find it through our Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC).

Inside the Great Court at the British MuseumDid you know that Google has run a project that brings objects from museums around the wolrd and art galleries right into your front room? It’s called the Google Art Project.

No need to travel the world when you can walk round museums and galleries virtually. Saves money on travel. Plus it means you avoid the art crowds!

Take a look at this virtual museum view that guides you down an empty gallery in the Acropolis Museum to the East Frieze (Block VI).

It’s 100 today to the start of the London Olympics Games. But did you also know that part of the celebrations includes a Cultural Olympiad?

Visit the London Festival 2012 page to find out about events happening to mark the Olympics. These include art, music, plays, dance and much more. It runs from 21 June to 9 September. You can search by artist and venue.


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