Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘advice

Reading Well pile of books

We are in the process of adding titles from the Reading Agency’s Reading Well book selection into our library.

Health professionals and young people have recommended the books on the Reading Well. The books help you combat anxiety, depression, lack of confidence, stress, bullying and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

 

Here are the latest arrivals from the list which are on our shelves for you to borrow:

Kite Spirit by Sita Bramacharmi

The Self-Esteem Team’s Guide to Sex, Drugs and WTFs!! by Grace Barrett

House of Windows by Alexia Casale

Quiet the Mind: an Illustrated Guide on How to Meditate by Matthew Johnstone

Everyday by David Levithan

Blame My Brain  – the Amazing Teenage Brain Revealed by Nicola Morgan

I’ll Give Your the Sun by Jandy Nelson

We’ll post again when the next batch of titles have been added to our book shelves.

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Film festival figures by Lacy Landre (2012) is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0.

At the risk of being very unpopular just before Summer begins, a reminder: You’re never done studying. Thinking about careers and building employability skills brings to mind the question often asked of children: What do you want to be when you grow up? An astronaut, a business person, a teacher, a dancer, a doctor. It’s usually a one word answer or “I don’t know”. Perhaps more useful is to ask: What would you like to continue learning?

In ‘What Color is Your Parachute?’ they suggest listing all the jobs you’ve ever dreamt of doing. In those jobs are clues to what kind of career would suit you. Sometimes I dream of being a diver, a fashion designer and a home-schooling mum. Yet I don’t really want all that comes with those jobs, I want the best parts – as they seem to me. Designing something new, exploring new places, teaching and learning with interesting human beings. So there are many careers that could suit those interests, that also make the most of the skills and knowledge I have chosen to develop through passion, hard work and luck.

An article by Raghav Haran provides some wonderful career advice – all very applicable to lifelong learning: take a different approach to the norm and don’t put limits on your ambitions. Many women know how to achieve against all odds.

You can always find out more, and most people stop short of that, so in seeking out answers and information you are already getting ahead of the rest. Here’s where the LRC and libraries really comes into play – we are the home of the ‘find out more’ mindset.

If you’re looking for ways to cultivate that mindset check out ‘Independent Thinking’ by Ian Gilbert who brings the mindset to life through stories and observations on education. The Phoebe Walters Room has inspiring career books and university prospectuses.

Gold Mine by Kuznetsov is licensed under CC by 2.0

Gold Mine by Kuznetsov is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

First of all, what do we mean by information overload? It is that feeling of falling down a dark hole when there is too much information to carry out a task. So even simple tasks can be made difficult when we are faced with too many options and no specific direction.

For example, you may need to find out about main theorists for a subject for your UCAS application. As Confucius is credited with saying ‘You can not open a book without learning something.’ There are entire libraries online and offline devoted to human knowledge. Where do you start?

If you have access to lots of information this gives you the chance to be selective and find a direction. The trouble is how can you be selective without being biased or limited? How can you read it all? We all need help with overcoming our biases, speed reading and managing time. The key is not learning willy-nilly (although this can be great too sometimes!) but to focus on what you need to learn for the task at hand. Finding the most appropriate, relevant nuggets of information is the ultimate challenge of academic study (and who knows, probably in life too!).

There is no one way to cope with information overload. We would like to hear about your advice to other students on that awful feeling of being overwhelmed with too many sources, too many theories, too many words. What do you do? What if you are dyslexic? What if you are starved for time?

If you post a tip to us by email, on Twitter or in the LRC and you may receive a World Science Day calendar thanks to UNESCO.

Careers materialWe’ve been updating and adding to our material on careers. We not only have material if you’re thinking about studying at university but we’ve also got material if you’re returning to work after a career break or looking for a new area to work in.

Babcock’s Working in series is great for giving you:

  • skills
  • qualities
  • training
  • qualifications
  • you need for a job.

Read more about their material on the Babcock Lifeskills website.

As usual we try to make as much as we can available in different formats so we’ve added these ebooks

Plus we add to our LRC Careers advice page on the Virtual Learning Environment.