Hillcroft LRC

Posts Tagged ‘acquisitions

Vote for books new booksReading for study and development is probably taking over most of our time in and outside of college. Yet we wanted to let you know about the new books available that might not directly go into essays, lessons or CVs but help in other ways by taking our mind of things and being inspiring.

At the beginning of the year we had a vote on the VLE about which of the best books of 2014 to order in for our library. So your voices have been heard and here is a selection of the new offerings in biography/fiction:

H is for Hawk by Helen MacDonald.

Penelope Fitzgerald: a life by Hermione Lee.

The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton.

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng.

Next we are looking at mind-boosting books. Which you would like to see in the LRC?

This year the books on the list were chosen by people who are affected by cancer who found them good reads in difficult times.

I have picked up The Humans, which I find is a humorous addition to my train journeys. You can suggest your own mind-boosting books on social media by adding the #moodboosting to the public status update or tweet. For example, I found the memoir Love with a Chance of Drowning when it was first published after reading Torre de Roche’s blog. She really is an inspiring and down-to-earth woman whose adventures at sea took me out of everyday life and gave me back my propensity to dream.

There is also other books shortlisted for awards that would be great for the LRC. There’s the Bailey’s Prize for Women’s Fiction for instance. Let us know what you think of any of these possible books to buy by commenting, email, on Twitter or Facebook or in person.

Have a good bank holiday weekend!

Advertisements

We have been busy searching for and ordering DVDs that feature brilliant actors such as Julie Christie and Glenn Close in their later years. Media representations of older people can be mainly of stereotypes, such as the grumpy old man or the nice little old lady. These films go beyond the stereotypes and open our world to view from different perspectives. Many books and films use the story-telling device of having an older person looking back on their youth and the events that happened to them. These movies don’t do that, they focus on the present time of the characters and what happens after or approaching retirement age.

The themes that they cover include loyalty, the autumn of life and separation of loved ones through death and traumatic experiences. ‘Away from Her’, ‘Still Mine’ and ‘Poetry’ also deal with the difficult subject of Alzheimer’s disease (a form of dementia). ‘Albert Nobbs’ is about a butler who wants to get away from his job in which he has had to pretend to be a man for 30 years. It’s not all doom and gloom though as ‘The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel’ paints a humourous portrait of older people from Britain adapting to new situations in India.

You can borrow up to 3 DVDs (free of charge) during staffed hours 9.00am-5.30pm, Monday to Friday. We have many more you can browse too, there’s bound to be something you’re interested in. You can recommend something by leaving a comment below or speak with us.

LRC, future proof, quick reads 013They are here! Six new titles from Quick Reads for 2015:

Our Future Proof students are going to read ‘Street Cat Bob’ in class on the Kindles. We invited the lively group into the LRC to have a look at the full range of books today. Many people are participating in the Six Book Challenge and have borrowed a Quick Read or two (or more!).

Each new book has a different genre and will suit most tastes.  The settings are all in Europe though I think. It is a shame not to include other parts of the world. There is a memoir, romance, thriller and an historical one. I am not sure how to classify ‘Dead Man Talking’ as it sounds a bit off the wall (in a good way!).The author Roddy Doyle won the Booker Prize in 1993 so no doubt his Quick Read will be a page-turner. We are keen to hear back about what people think of them and fill out a book review slip.

BiographiesHappy new year! We have received our first box of new books. Inside are two biographies on two remarkable fashion designers’ lives.

Firstly, ‘Elsa Schiaparelli: a biography’ by Meryle Secrest looks fascinating as it is not someone I have ever heard of. She was from Rome but then moved to London, New York and Paris during the first half of the 20th Century. Having inspiration and collaboration with artists as famous as Dali made her a star of her time.

Secondly, ‘Vivienne Westwood’ by Vivienne Westwood and Ian Kelly, is an instantly recognisable name to me. Having a quick delve into this hardback book uncovers a chapter which highlights her popularity in Asia. In Mandarin her name translates to ‘Dowager Empress West’. It also looks at her honoured place in American fashion resulting from her designer wedding dress being chosen in the hugely-successful ‘Sex and the City’ movie in 2008. She is also an activist and her voice and actions have a wide resonance.

Having a look at the blurbs and on wikipedia, it is clear that both women had lots of fashion moments of surprise and ingenuity and they often went against convention (as many artists do!). Reading about their lives gives us an insight into their cultural influences over the decades. We have lots more biographies on famous and influential women on our shelves. Come have a browse next time you are in the LRC.

Jane Eyre Graphic Novel

Jane Eyre – graphic novel adapted by Amy Corzine

A new acquisition for the LRC is Jane Eyre, a classic of English literature by Charlotte Brontë. This book can be a daunting prospect to read. The Penguin paperback edition has over 500 pages. However, this edition is adapted as a graphic novel.

Graphic novels are closely linked with comic books with the story mainly told in pictures. Unlike comic books, graphic novels tell the story in one volume rather than over separate issues. Don’t just think they about superheros either! They cover all genres of fiction and non-fiction. Many graphic novels have serious, adult themes such as war, love and belonging. They can be sophisticated and engrossing as they bring together two artistic forms – illustration and writing.

Graphic novels can be more a accessible format especially for visual learners. It can be a good medium for those people who don’t like reading but want to be immersed in a story. The artwork kick-starts the imagination and helps you engage with times, characters and places far away from your everyday experience. It can make a nice change to read something less dense in words, particularly for ESOL learners (English for Speakers of Other Languages).

It takes some adjustment to read a graphic novel, but the basic principle is the same as all books: left to right and from the top to bottom of the page.

One of the most widely-known graphic novels is Marjane Satrapi’s autobiography Persepolis which tells her story of growing up in Iran and emigrating to France. This has been made into a film too. Either the book or DVD forms you can borrow from the LRC.

We also have a number of other graphic novels available for example:

  • Fables: Rose Red – tells the story of Snow White’s sister but it is not the fairy tale as you might be familiar with.
  • Adamtine – a horror story involving a group of strangers who vanish on a train journey.

Please tell us what you think of graphic novels by email, in person or leave us a comment below. We are hoping to start a shelf to promote graphic novels. Which adapted books would you like the LRC to add to our graphic novel shelf?


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 288 other followers

Follow me on Twitter

Advertisements