Hillcroft LRC

Archive for May 2016

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Film festival figures by Lacy Landre (2012) is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0.

At the risk of being very unpopular just before Summer begins, a reminder: You’re never done studying. Thinking about careers and building employability skills brings to mind the question often asked of children: What do you want to be when you grow up? An astronaut, a business person, a teacher, a dancer, a doctor. It’s usually a one word answer or “I don’t know”. Perhaps more useful is to ask: What would you like to continue learning?

In ‘What Color is Your Parachute?’ they suggest listing all the jobs you’ve ever dreamt of doing. In those jobs are clues to what kind of career would suit you. Sometimes I dream of being a diver, a fashion designer and a home-schooling mum. Yet I don’t really want all that comes with those jobs, I want the best parts – as they seem to me. Designing something new, exploring new places, teaching and learning with interesting human beings. So there are many careers that could suit those interests, that also make the most of the skills and knowledge I have chosen to develop through passion, hard work and luck.

An article by Raghav Haran provides some wonderful career advice – all very applicable to lifelong learning: take a different approach to the norm and don’t put limits on your ambitions. Many women know how to achieve against all odds.

You can always find out more, and most people stop short of that, so in seeking out answers and information you are already getting ahead of the rest. Here’s where the LRC and libraries really comes into play – we are the home of the ‘find out more’ mindset.

If you’re looking for ways to cultivate that mindset check out ‘Independent Thinking’ by Ian Gilbert who brings the mindset to life through stories and observations on education. The Phoebe Walters Room has inspiring career books and university prospectuses.

Reading Ahead posterIt’s just over a month longer until the end of the 2015/16 Reading Ahead challenge – the deadline is 27th June. There is still time to choose 6 items to read and write a short review on each in your little yellow reading diary (ask us for one). The benefits of reading for pleasure are immense including stress reduction and vocabulary expansion. We also offer a sticker for each completed diary entry. A sticker may seem like a small reward but it is the little things that matter sometimes. There is also a certificate for completers and names will be entered into a national prize draw.

If you are signed up already you can get a digital participant badge on the VLE. Find a checklist and a survey to complete on the VLE under Library -> Services -> Reading for Pleasure.

Talking of stickers – you can find books more easily with stickers on the spine telling you whether they are reference, biographies, short stories, and easy reads. We’re also thinking of getting some customised stickers to highlight books on women’s topics and other gems of the LRC.

 

 

Cancer books

Last week, a gene breakthrough for breast cancer was reported in the media. NHS Choices expands on the details of this research which was originally published in the scientific journal Nature.

This large study was conducted by British scientists but funding came from a number of sources across the world. It involved 560 people with breast cancer with scientists comparing the DNA from their cancer cells with DNA from their surrounding normal cells. They isolated 93 genes that if they mutated, could make normal cells become cancerous.

This was a laboratory study, hopefully leading to a better understanding of the genetic mutations and their causes and in the much longer term, targeted personalised treatments for breast cancer. Doctors and scientists believe that through limiting alcohol, keeping physically active and maintaining body weight, the risk of breast cancer can be reduced.

To find out more about cancer, psychological support for cancer sufferers and personal stories of people with cancer, explore these items on the web and the LRC catalogue:

Oxford Dictionary of Science 6th edn. (2010) by Daintith and Martin

Advanced Biology (2000) by Roberts, Reiss and Monger

In the body of the world: a memoir of cancer and connection (2013) by Ensler

Gratitude (2015) by Sacks

Health Psychology 5th edn. (2012) by Ogden and also as an ebook

Cancer Research UK

Baby at the Beach Cafe by Lucy DiamondWe decided to run our World Book Night on Friday 29 April so we could maximise the attendance of our Next Level learners although officially World Book Night is 23 April.

This year we were giving out copies of Lucy Diamond’s Baby at the Beach Cafe which is one of the 2016 Quick Reads based around the main character Evie who has inherited a cafe from her aunt in Cornwall (in a previous Lucy Diamond novel called The Beach Cafe)and is now expecting a baby and needs a maternity leave stand in to cover her absence. Her husband finds Helen who has escaped from the stresses of city life. But unfortunately the two women do not get on.

As a result all of activities and display were around the beach themes. Our LRC Assistant Debbie selected poems with a sea theme to inspire the Next Level learners and other attendees from Pre Access, English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL): Preparation for Work, Access to Higher Education: Humanities and Social Sciences and Access to Higher Education: Health and Human Sciences to write their own poems. Our LRC Facilitator Philippa made a beach-themed banner and we had a games table going so the participants could go around the tables:

  • making their own sunglasses
  • doing a word search
  • putting sections from three different stories together  from a Quick Read and graded readers (Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson and Clare West, Tinker’s Island by Stephen Rabley and Michael Salter and A Sea Change by Veronica Henry)
  • working out which photo of a beach taken from Britannica ImageQuest matched the pins on a world map
  • identifying famous beaches from around the United Kingdom on an interactive map of the British Isles.

Debbie also made a lucky dip sand box with free prizes.

The refreshments followed the beach theme with popcorn,  savoury fish-shaped snacks and ice pops!

Many thanks to the students from Next Level and the tutors who gave us feedback requesting more events like this during the year! Read more about our activities and what our students thought on our Sway.

 

 

Infographic on transplanation

Just after Easter, there was an interesting infographic in the Independent-i (Thursday 7 April page 2). It provided readers with transplant activity for the year 2014-15 e.g. 180 heart transplants; the numbers around transplantation like the 22 million people on the transplant register and a history of the key transplant developments worldwide starting with the first corneal transplant in 1905.

Want more information about transplantation? Explore the following LRC and web items:

Oxford Concise Medical Dictionary 9th edn (2015) by Marvin

DK Science: the definitive visual guide 2nd edn (2011) by Hart-Davis

NHS Blood & Transplant clinical website

Keen on infographic materials generally? Take a look at:

Visual aid (2008) by Draught Associates

The State of the World Atlas 9th edn (2013) by Smith

ebook: available too.