Hillcroft LRC

Archive for February 2016

Feminist writersDid you know that BBC Radio 4 are running a season on feminist writing from the 1970s to the present day? It’s called Riot Girls.

You can catch up with broadcasts on BBC iPlayer.

The season includes Fay Weldon’s The Lives and Loves of a She Devil. The next episode is 2100 on Saturday 27 February. There is a set of 3 plays called Katy charting the feminist movement across three generations of women. Plus there’s Erica Jong’s Fear of Flying which is running in 5 episodes examining a young woman’s sexual liberation which was published in 1973. The next episode is today at 1945.

This year is the bicentenary of Charlotte Bronte’s birth. For our Access to Higher Education Humanities and Social Science students Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre in the Fifteen Minute Drama slot will be broadcasting on Radio 4 next week at 1045.  There’s a In Our Time episode on Jane Eyre on BBC iPlayer too. Our learners compare Bronte’s novel with Jean Rhys Wide Sargasso Sea. Spark Notes gives you a summary of the plot and analyses themes and characters. As it does for Jane Eyre too.

Brain food journals‘In search of the optimal brain diet’ an article in Scientific American Mind this month, lists healthy brain diets as those coming from the Mediterranean, Okinawa and Scandinavia. This is likely to be due to the frequency of fish and lack of sugar in these diets. Oily fish (like salmon and tuna) contain omega-3 fatty acids that aid neurological and mental health. The best of these fatty acids is docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) because it improves nerve to nerve communication and helps the functioning of brain cell membranes.

Besides the importance of fatty acids, increasingly scientists believe there is a link between the trillions of bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms (known as microbiota) that live on and in the human body with our health and wellbeing. The greatest concentrations of microbiota are found in the gastrointestinal tract where food is digested and absorbed. This is explored in detail in ‘Human microbiota’ in the current edition of Biological Sciences Review.

For students wishing to find out more, look up some of our nutrition resources.

 Ebooks include:

Gibney, M. (2009) Introduction to Human Nutrition https://www.dawsonera.com/readonline/9781444322965

Geissler, C.  & Powers, H. (2009) Fundamentals of Human Nutrition https://www.dawsonera.com/readonline/9780702049903

On the general shelves are:

Barasi, M. (2003) Human nutrition: a health perspective http://bit.ly/1Pz3e73

Barasi, M. (2007) Nutrition at a glance http://bit.ly/1PMbVZD;

Bender, D. (2014) Nutrition: a very short introduction http://heritage.hillcroft.ac.uk/HeritageScripts/Hapi.dll/search2?searchTerm0=bender%20 ;

Holford, P. (2008) Optimum nutrition made easy http://heritage.hillcroft.ac.uk/HeritageScripts/Hapi.dll/search2?searchTerm0=holford%20

Perlmutter, D. & Loberg, K. (2015) Brain Maker: the power of gut microbes to heal and protect your brain. http://heritage.hillcroft.ac.uk/HeritageScripts/Hapi.dll/search2?searchTerm0=perlmutter%20 

and on the reference shelves are:

Dictionary of Food Science and Nutrition (2006) http://bit.ly/1ofQnxp

Hark, L. (2007) Nutrition for life http://heritage.hillcroft.ac.uk/HeritageScripts/Hapi.dll/search2?searchTerm0=hark%20 .

 

LGBT History Month folder 16The LRC team along with our Welfare Officer have been busy this month in raising awareness for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender History Month. If you haven’t been in the LRC recently we’ve put up a display with colourful folder dividers and book covers. Please take a divider and add it to a folder and devote just a page to LGBT articles. We’ve picked out the best LGBT authors along with fiction, biographies and DVDs. The key point is that it is vital to renew our support for minority groups through action, education and compassion. Libraries can help raise awareness through access to a range of resources on as many different topics as there are people.

Find out more on our Sway webpage with videos, links to useful websites and audio resources.

https://sway.com/s/AsBKWRjvBizV4gDB/embed

FBooks About Chinaebruary is Chinese New Year and this year is the Year of the Monkey. If you’re in London there’s a special celebration with a parade from Charing Cross Road to Shaftesbury Avenue and lions in China Town. Plus there’s entertainment in Shaftesbury Avenue and on Trafalgar Square. Find the timings on the Mayor of London/London Assembly Chinese New Year 2016 page.

Do you know which Chinese year it was when you were born? The Travel China Guide will help you find it.

Check out some of the material we have for you to borrow about China. If English is not your first language then Patrick Catel’s China gives you a good overview of the culture, politics, history, environment and wildlife of the country.

If you’re interested in art then Chinese Art in Detail by Carol Michelson and Jane Portal may be of interest.

We’ve also got a of biography about China:

Falling Leaves Return to their Roots: the True Story of an Unwanted Chinese Daughter by Adeline Yen Mah

Or how about some fiction? We have these to tempt you:

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan (which we’ve also got on DVD)

Everything I Never Told You  by Celeste Ng

 

Cite Them RightWe were recently asked to provide referencing revision sessions across all our longer courses as tutors felt it would be a timely reminder half way through the year.

Despite knowing about online referencing generators, Learning Resources have been reluctant to teach to any particular one as none seemed to match what we taught and we felt it would only confuse students. However, our research continued and we are now promoting RefMe. This is freely available on the desktop and as a mobile app. We particularly like this generator because when students select the Harvard style, it relates specifically to Cite them right 9th edition by Pears and Shields and published by Palgrave. This is the style we teach across the college. Data can be generated digitally (through a dropdown selection) or manually and students can generate multiple bibliographies, all saved on the cloud.

Our level 2 sessions were evaluated using electronic post-it notes provided by Linoit. Here is a selection of student comments (thank you for being guinea pigs) which were all very positive:

  • This is really cool. I won’t lose track of my references
  • RefMe makes life easy
  • It is a time saver. It will make my references very clear to read. It shows I am not plagiarising
  • It will help me to be organised

Primal PicturesLast week Primal Pictures moved onto a new platform at Anatomy.TV. Primal Pictures gives you a three-dimensional view of the human body. It covers the systems of the body;  skeletal, muscular, digestive, lymphatic, intergumentary, nervous, cardiovascular, reproductive and metabolic.

Each of the systems come with a Getting Started section which explains what you will learn in the module and an introduction to the topic. It then shows you the effects of the aging process on it and examines the different types of conditions and diseases that affect the system. Lastly there is a case study with questions to test your learning.

Our Access to Higher Education Health and Human Sciences and Level 3 Diploma in Massage Therapy students find Primal an essential resource.

We’ve updated our Virtual Learning Environment Eresources page with the new links and the new help videos which you can access on YouTube.

We get Primal Pictures from Jisc Collections. If you want to find out more about what material Jisc can offer take a look at their website.