Hillcroft LRC

Archive for March 2015

Political women biographiesYou may have caught BBC2’s Hillary Clinton: the Power of Women which was broadcast on 25 March 2015. The programme looked at whether women’s situation in society has changed since Clinton made a speech expressing womens rights are a human right. Their rights are seen through the eyes of three other powerful women; former United States Secretary of States Hillary Clinton, Madeleine Albright and Condolezza Rice as well as women in Afghanistan, Egypt, India and Liberia who have tried to make the changes.

If you’d like to find out more about Hillary Clinton we have these biographies in our Learning Resources Centre:

A Woman in Charge: the Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton by Carl Bernstein

Hillary Clinton by Michael Burgan (easy read)

If you’re interested in more on women politicians take a look at :

Momentum: the Struggle for Peace, Politics and the People by Mo Mowlam

Everybody Matters: a Memoir by Mary Robinson

Baroness Scotland of Asthal by Sue Adler (easy read)

Dilma Rousseff by Catherine Chambers (easy read)

The Lady and the Peacock: the Life of Aung San Suu Kyi by Peter Popham

Angela Merkel by Claire Throp (easy read)

 

We have been busy searching for and ordering DVDs that feature brilliant actors such as Julie Christie and Glenn Close in their later years. Media representations of older people can be mainly of stereotypes, such as the grumpy old man or the nice little old lady. These films go beyond the stereotypes and open our world to view from different perspectives. Many books and films use the story-telling device of having an older person looking back on their youth and the events that happened to them. These movies don’t do that, they focus on the present time of the characters and what happens after or approaching retirement age.

The themes that they cover include loyalty, the autumn of life and separation of loved ones through death and traumatic experiences. ‘Away from Her’, ‘Still Mine’ and ‘Poetry’ also deal with the difficult subject of Alzheimer’s disease (a form of dementia). ‘Albert Nobbs’ is about a butler who wants to get away from his job in which he has had to pretend to be a man for 30 years. It’s not all doom and gloom though as ‘The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel’ paints a humourous portrait of older people from Britain adapting to new situations in India.

You can borrow up to 3 DVDs (free of charge) during staffed hours 9.00am-5.30pm, Monday to Friday. We have many more you can browse too, there’s bound to be something you’re interested in. You can recommend something by leaving a comment below or speak with us.


DVD triangle
The British Film Institute (BFI) has launched five films from the London Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender film festival Flare onto its BFI Player for you to watch for free. The five films look at the theme of love as a basic human right. The British Council is also promoting the films globally in countries like China, India, Ukraine, Poland and Israel.

The festival runs over 10 days starting on 19 March 2015. Each of the films will be available each day on the BFI Player. Wednesday 25 March is a ‘fivefilms4 freedom’ day dedicated to everyone using social media to view the films at the same time. The films are:

Chance –  two older men  finding love after meeting accidentally in a park
Code Academy – a girl takes on the persona of a boy in cyberspace to get the girl of her dreams
Morning is Broken – coming of age story in rural England
True Wheel – documentary about a bicycle workshop for the city’s gay, transgender and women’s communities in Detroit
An Afternoon – a teenage boy summons up the confidence to tell another boy how he feels about him.

Pageant of women's work 1920

Pageant of women’s work 1920 from Hillcroft College archives

Looking in our archives of documents created in Hillcroft College reveals how much has changed and how much hasn’t. Fascinating primary sources for a social historian.

The Annual Reports provide details such as the students who were enrolled and lived in the college, who paid their fees (often their employers like Debenhams and Robertsons of jam fame) and what they ended up doing after studying here.

The Annual Report from 1920 also has a pamphlet inside it listing the schedule for the ‘Pageant of Women’s Work’. This consisted of a fair number of presentations and/or readings given by the students on the topic of famous and influential women through the ages. It starts with ‘Women in primitive times’ and goes through until ‘The woman professor’, ‘suffragist’ and ‘The woman M.P.’. They also talked about Florence Nightingale – we featured her this year in the LRC, 95 years later.

Take a look also at the footnote “Words for Tableau VI from Olive Schreiner‘s ‘Women & Labour'” – they were referencing too! Now if only we knew the page number…

The Woman’s Song of Freedom was published by the London Society for Women’s Suffrage in 1911, the music sheet can be found in the British Library’s music collections. Would anyone like to sing it again?

Jane Austen booksFor our display for International Women’s Day, we had to narrow down our selection of inspirational women to just ten. We had a science theme so many of the women who made waves in the arts and humanities were left out. With a couple of students commenting on the absence of the author Jane Austen, it made us think about this inspirational woman in particular.

According to the website Biography.com Jane didn’t receive much recognition during her lifetime and that it was only in the 1920s that people began to see her six works of fiction as genius. In Tomalin’s biography of Austen (2000 p. 11) she informs us that “Jane Austen’s novels do not ramble”. Her wit and observations into society are remarkable as well as her tightly-woven plots. You can find her writing and adaptations of her work in the LRC by searching the catalogue for “Jane Austen”. The BBC’s TV adaptation of Pride and Prejudice is one of the most loved of all. The novel was originally titled “First Impressions” whilst Northanger Abbey was first called ‘Susan’.

December 16th is Jane Austen Day in celebration of her lasting influence. Most events take place in Bath, where she once lived. If you can’t wait that long to start finding out about Jane and her world, you can also read the online magazine about all things regency (food, fashion, history).

Jane Austen has been in the news recently as a picture of Jane will replace that of Charles Darwin on the £10 note. This was after a campaign led by journalist and feminist activist Caroline Criado-Perez which brought the lack of women on bank notes to the attention of the Bank of England (and the world). The irony is that Jane sold Northanger Abbey to the publisher for £10 in 1803 (see entry for Jane Austen in Encyclopaedia Britannica) which according to the National Archives currency converter would be about £330 in the modern day. Not very much money at all! If only we could go back in time and let her know how priceless her work is.

Which other women do you feel should have made our inspirational women poster or feature more in our everyday lives?

Who am I? Name the inspirational woman. Student quiz for International Women's Day Open from Monday 9th March until Saturday 14th March

Who am I? Name the inspirational woman. Student quiz for International Women’s Day. Open from Monday 9th March until Saturday 14th March

We are excited to announce our competition for students to celebrate International Women’s Day on 8th March. We have put together a giant timeline of 10 inspirational and pioneering women’s biographies and photographs. The more women you can name the greater your chances to be in the draw to win a £50 book token or two £25 book tokens are also up for grabs. Prontaprint Surbiton have kindly donated these prizes (many thanks!).

Search tips can be found in the LRC as a new pamphlet. Feel free to ask us for help. There will be a few other clues in the LRC too so keep an eye out. There have also been hints posted on the Hillcroft College Facebook page so you can head over there to get start your search.

You won’t be able to miss our timeline and the submission forms next week. Putting together the quiz has opened our eyes to the amazing and fearless things women have achieved in the last 200 years and we hope it enthuses you to achieve something great in your own way.

WBN logo in headlineWe’re excited to discover we have been selected to be a World Book Night 2015 Institutional Giver. We’ve selected the books we’d like to give from the World Book Night 2015 list. We’ve now found out which book(s) we are giving away but we’re keeping it under our hats so we don’t spoil it for our staff and students!

We’ll be running an event for World Book Night at Hillcroft College for students and staff. As well as giving out the books from the 2015 list we’ll be getting students and staff to register to give away secondhand books they like or new ones they’ve bought themselves. If you’d like to do the same here is the link to be a World Book Night Volunteer.

We’ll let you know more about our event shortly.