Hillcroft LRC

Archive for December 2014

A quick message from the LRC team today. Whether it be for Christmas or another festival or celebration, we wish you all happy holidays. We are looking forward to seeing you all from 5th January 2015. If you have any suggestions for books or other resources the LRC could order for next term please email us over the holidays (lrc@hillcroft.ac.uk). Then we can evaluate your request when we get back and see what copies we could buy.

Colourful winter lights Brian Wilson (2008)

Brian Wilson (2008). No changes made to image.

 

 

 

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Cite Them RightLast week our LRC Manager was helping our Preaccess students complete their referencing for their Information Communications Technology (ICT)/Biology assignment. Many of the students had got links from websites but weren’t sure how to reference them and they were struggling with the websites trying to work out what the title was and the publication date.

Pears and Shields Cite Them Right gives you all the advice you need on how to create a reference for a website. It’s especially handy when you cannot find the author or date on the website and advises you what to do in the body of your essay and on a reference list. In the latest edition you’ll find referencing has gotten shorter – you don’t need to put [Online] in like you used to in the past. Referencing and Plagiarism by Kate Williams and Jude Carroll has a great graphic showing you the elements you’ll need online to form your reference.

If you’re getting mixed up about what order all the elements go in then just keep in mind  ‘It’s an author + date system’, as our LRC Assistant says. That immediately should trigger that you need the author to come first and then the date.

 

Listening cat (Dave Morris 2005)Having books read aloud can really bring them to life. Many audiobooks and podcasts on the subject of books and reading are possible to download for free online. For example, BBC Radio 4 has ‘Book at Bedtime’ with dramatised versions of famous and great books. They divide the stories into 15 minute episodes that air on weekdays at 22.45. You can listen online to episodes for free for up to 4 weeks after they have been aired. You can find them on the iPlayer radio, there’s a mobile app for that or you can listen to it on the computer.

The next book reading (22nd December) is going to be ‘The Diary of a Provincial Lady’. It’s a comedy written by EM Delafield set in 1930s Britain and according to this review it is a real hoot (despite it’s age and fusty-sounding title).

Previous books they had broadcast include ‘The Bone Clocks’ by David Mitchell and ‘The Miniaturist’ by Jessie Burton. Both of these books have been highlighted on a number of prominent lists looking back at the best books of the year. So the books chosen are leading-edge and in high demand, getting them for free and often read by famous actors makes subscribing to their newsletter worthwhile. The LRC team are putting together a poll on which award-winning fiction books to buy in paperback copy in the New Year – so watch this space!

Grayson Perry trail and National Portrait Gallery brochureAs a college Hillcroft aims to reflect the diverse background of its learners and staff. Our Access to Higher Education: Humanities and Social Science students look at identity as part of their Psychology and Sociology units. If you’re interested in diversity and equality then you’ll like the Turner Prize winning artist Grayson Perry’s exhibition Who Are You? running until 15 March 2014 at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

The exhibition follows the 14 items in the exhibition which appeared in the Channel 4 programme Grayson Perry: Who Are You? broadcast this autumn. They include a poster representing the identity and beliefs of a deaf community group, a Benin-styled statue of Peter Pan depicting a female to male transsexual and a young British woman from Kent who has converted to Islam encapsulated in a silk Hijab. Plus 3 statues of women from a women’s group which supports so called obese women. One of Perry’s signature ceramic pots portrays a gay couple who have adopted a mixed race child. You can follow Grayson’s trail of works at the National Portrait Gallery.

If you’d like to find out more about the artwork go through backruns of the TV programme by visiting 4oD.

At the same time the National Portrait Gallery is displaying Suffragettes: Deeds Not Words examining how the suffragette movement spent the summer of 1914 increasing their fight for the vote and protesting against the Cat and Mouse Act up. The display runs up to 10 May 2015.

Both the exhibition and the display offer free entry.

Jane Eyre Graphic Novel

Jane Eyre – graphic novel adapted by Amy Corzine

A new acquisition for the LRC is Jane Eyre, a classic of English literature by Charlotte Brontë. This book can be a daunting prospect to read. The Penguin paperback edition has over 500 pages. However, this edition is adapted as a graphic novel.

Graphic novels are closely linked with comic books with the story mainly told in pictures. Unlike comic books, graphic novels tell the story in one volume rather than over separate issues. Don’t just think they about superheros either! They cover all genres of fiction and non-fiction. Many graphic novels have serious, adult themes such as war, love and belonging. They can be sophisticated and engrossing as they bring together two artistic forms – illustration and writing.

Graphic novels can be more a accessible format especially for visual learners. It can be a good medium for those people who don’t like reading but want to be immersed in a story. The artwork kick-starts the imagination and helps you engage with times, characters and places far away from your everyday experience. It can make a nice change to read something less dense in words, particularly for ESOL learners (English for Speakers of Other Languages).

It takes some adjustment to read a graphic novel, but the basic principle is the same as all books: left to right and from the top to bottom of the page.

One of the most widely-known graphic novels is Marjane Satrapi’s autobiography Persepolis which tells her story of growing up in Iran and emigrating to France. This has been made into a film too. Either the book or DVD forms you can borrow from the LRC.

We also have a number of other graphic novels available for example:

  • Fables: Rose Red – tells the story of Snow White’s sister but it is not the fairy tale as you might be familiar with.
  • Adamtine – a horror story involving a group of strangers who vanish on a train journey.

Please tell us what you think of graphic novels by email, in person or leave us a comment below. We are hoping to start a shelf to promote graphic novels. Which adapted books would you like the LRC to add to our graphic novel shelf?

Tuesday 25 November’s Guardian has an interesting article Woolf is for Women – and Mailer’s for Men? How Readers Favour Authors of Own Gender on research done by the website Good Reads about their readers reading habits. The survey found most women and men on their website read fiction where the author matches their gender. Any surprise to you?

However mostly their readers didn’t make a choice to read a male or female author from the start but just chose a book according to how interesting it seemed them.

Good Reads was inspired to run the survey having followed the Twitter campaign #Readwomen encouraging people to read books by female authors. This year a Twitter group @Readwomen2014 has been dedicated to getting female authors’ output read.

Today there’s a chance for libraries to register as a giver for World Book Night 2015. We’ll be selecting the books which we’d like to give out and you can view them on their website too. It’s your chance to be a volunteer and give out books. Plus if you register as a volunteer you can give out books you own that you want to give away free yourself. You will need to register by 30 January 2015.